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An ATARI Users Magazine 




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LUNAR V.-MERLIIM'S MAGIC SQUARE ..GRAB AN APPLE.. 
MEMORY MAPPED SCREENS.. NEWS.. REVIEWS.... 



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ARROW Of DEATH Pt1 
ARROW OF DEATH Pt 2 
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,7M 



An ATARI Users Magazine 




CONTENTS 



ISSUE 4 



JULY/AUGUST 1983 



EDITORIAL .. ... 4 

NEWS— ATARI'S NEW MACHINES ............ .... 4 

READERS LETTERS 6 

LUNAR V Stan Ockers 8 

USER GROUPS/CONTACT 10 

ARCADE ACTION — REVIEWS . Harvey Kong Tin 11 

MERLIN'S MAGIC SQUARE Steve Hutton \2 

MEMORY MAPPED SCREENS Phil Griffin 14 

BASIC TIMING David Harry 16 

GRAB AN APPLE ..... Jamie Athas & Garry Francis 18 

SOFTWARE REVIEWS 20 

DISK SORT Peter Franey 24 

FIRST STEPS John Dimmer 28 

BUG CLUB CALL 30 

Cover illustration by Mike Roper 




Editor 



Editorial Offices 



Les Ellinghom 
Tel. 0785 41153 



Printed by Birbeck & Sons Ltd. 
Published by ABACUS 



PwGE 6 is a Users mtgtilnt and r*\ its entirely an reader* 
support in submitting articles ind programs. The tin is to 
«>plore Atari computing through tht exchange of information 
ind Knowledge and vi* cannot unfortunately pay far articles 
aublishtd, We hop* you win gain satisfaction from seeing 
your work published and in turn we hop* you wilt learn from 
articles submitted by other readers, 



Whilst ue take whatever steps we can to ensure the accuracy 
of articles and program* submitted and the content of 
advertisements*, PAGE 6 cannot be held responsible for any 
errors or claims made by advertisers. 






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available from: 



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PAGE 6 is published bi- 
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of Atari, Inc. All references 
should be so noted 



J 



PAGE 6 



Issue4 



EDITORIAL 



THE ATARI WORLD 



Welcome to a truly international edition of 
PAGE 6 which features articles and programs 
from as far away as New Zealand and Australia 
as well as from the U.S.A. There are of course 
also programs, articles and reviews from the 
U.K. Rather unbelievably, PAGE 6 now has 
subscribers in Austria, Sweden, Portugal, 
Greece, New Zealand, Australia and America as 
well as places as far apart in Great Britain as 
Guernsey and the Isle of Benbecula in the Outer 
Hebrides! Atari Basic is obviously an 
international language and it is very exciting to 
find individual enthusiasts and User Groups all 
over the world. 

The purpose of having an international 
edition is twofold, Firstly to reflect the wide 
interest in Atari computing and share our 
knowledge and understanding, but more 
importantly to show Users in the U.K. that we 
are in danger of being left behind. You would 
expect the folks in America to be fairly 
advanced in their knowledge — after all they 
invented the machine— but it came as a 
pleasant surprise to find that there is quite an 
active Atari community in New Zealand and 
Australia. What's more the articles and 
programs featured in their User Group 
newsletters are of a very high standard. So 
where does that leave us? Seemingly a long 
way behind, but I can't really believe that 
British Atari owners are not capable of 
producing some really good programs and 
articles. Some of these have been featured in 
this and previous issues of PAGE 6 and all 
those contributors can be proud that their work 
is being seen all over the world, but there is still 
a need for many more articles and programs. It 
is not that we can't understand computers — 
just look at the number of programs written for 
other machines like the BBC and Spectrum — so 
come on Atari owners get in touch if you have a 
program or article which could be featured in 
PAGE 6, It is very nice to be able to feature 
programs from overseas but PAGE 6 ought to 
be a forum for EXCHANGE of ideas and 
programs and I hope that we in the U.K. can 
provide our overseas friends with something of 
interest. 



BACK ISSUES 
ARE NOW AVAILABLE 

Issues 1, 2 & 3— 70p each inc. p. & p. 
Two issues together £1.25. All three £1.85 



NEWS 



ATARI'S NEW MACHINES 

Biggest news this month, indeed this year, is 
the unveiling by Atari at the Chicago Consumer 
Electronics Show of FOUR new machines. Top 
of the range is the 1450XLD which if marketed 
properly could leave a lot of rotting Apples 
about! The computer features a built-in double- 
sided, double-density disk drive with provision 
to add a further drive. Also a built-in modem 
and a built-in voice synthesizer. The disk drive 
will operate two to three times faster than the 
current drive. Nothing revolutionary you might 
think, but wait for the price. Under $1000. 
That's just over £700. What is going to make 
this all the more remarkable is a CP/M 
expansion unit allowing literally hundreds of 
business programs to run on the Atari. 

Next down the line is the 1400XL which is 
essentially the same without the built-in disk 
drive, followed by the 800XL about which no 
details are known at present. The lower end of 
the range is the 600XL which comes as 16K but 
is expandable to 64K. All the machines are said 
to include built-in Atari Basic (Revision B). 

Not only new computers but new 
peripherals. A new letter quality printer, the 



Your friendly 
Pro fessional 

Printer- 




YEARS 




1883-1983 

Birbeck and Sons Ltd, 

26-28 Fleet Street ■ Birmingham B31JY 
021-2364602 









Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



News 



ATARI 1027, which does not require an 
interface. A new Disk Drive, the 1050, with DOS 
2.0S and DOS 3.0 available later in the year 
providing double density. A new direct-connect 
modem with auto facilities. New joysticks 
(including remote control!, a TRAK-BALL, light 
pen and (hopefully at a reasonable price) a 
graphics touch tablet. 

NEW ATARI ONLY' CENTRE OPENS 

There has been quite a stir around 
Birmingham in recent weeks with the opening 
of the Birmingham Atari Centre run by Home 
Entertainments Ltd, The shop is believed to be 
the U.K.'s first dedicated Atari Centre selling 
Atari Home Computers and supporting 
software and peripherals. No Spectrums, no 
Orics, no Vies, nothing but the best! 

Before embarking on this venture Home 
Entertainments did a lot of market research 
amongst existing computer owners and 
intending purchasers. They found an almost 
unanimous response, what people wanted was 
somewhere they could find detailed 
information on their computer, where they 
could ask questions and be confident of 
obtaining a direct and knowledgable reply. In 
short, somewhere that dealt with their 
computer and their computer only. A specialist 
shop. With the Birmingham Atari Centre, Home 
Entertainments have set out to provide fust 
that. All of their staff are Atari owners and 
enthusiasts headed by Retail Sales Manager 
Keith Mason whose whole philosophy is to 
provide a complete service for the Atari owner. 
Keith told me, " What we hope to do is build a 
reputation on sen/ice and knowledge of the 
whole Atari scene, so that any Atari owner, or 
prospective purchaser, will know that he can 
come to us in the full expectation of finding 
what he wants or having his questions 
answered." To this end, the company has been 
working closely with the local User Group and 
hope to establish a back-up service second to 
none. If the folks in the shop can't answer your 
question they should be able to put you on to 
someone who can. 

At the moment the Company are 
concentrating on providing a first-class service 
for users in the West Midlands. They will 
shortly turn their attention to Mail Order but 
only when they know they can extend their 
service to this area. They have also introduced 
a Home Demonstration team, again staffed by 
people with Atari background, to provide you 
with a demonstration of the Atari Computers in 
your own home where you can see the 
machines to best advantage and ask whatever 
questions you wish. Here again the emphasis 
will be on after sales service as they are 





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conscious that home computing goes far 
beyond just buying a piece of hardware. Once 
you have bought an Atari, you can be confident 
that the full knowledge and assistance of the 
people at the Atari Centre will be available to 
you. 

The shop has onfy been open a few weeks 
but already Keith Mason has built up a 
considerable number of contacts in America 
and was one of the first in the U.K. to (earn 
about Atari's new machines. With the phone 
lines buzzing between here and the U.S., there 
should be no more long waits for news to reach 
the U.K., which can only be to the good of all 
U.K. Atari owners. 

The prospects certainly seem exciting but 
only time will tell whether the U.K, can support 
a dedicated independent Atari Centre. With 
many of the other 'specialist' shops drifting 
away to other machines there is certainly a 
need amongst Atari owners for such a centre 
but also a lingering doubt about whether a 
retail outlet dedicated to one machine can 
survive. That will depend very much on the 
individual user. If only Atari would recognise 
the amount of support and enthusiasm that 
exists for their machines and adjust their 
marketing accordingly, there would be no 
doubt about the success of the Birmingham 
Atari Centre and of Atari as the number one 
computer in the U.K. 



PAGE 6 



Issue 4 



INPUT 



Dear Les, 

The Calendar program in 
Issue 3 was one of the first 1 
have managed to type in with- 
out a bug. However on check- 
ing some dates in the 1880's 
the program was found to be 
incorrect. 1 am sure that there 
are many of us for whom 
'Grandad's birthday' would 
have been incorrectly calcu- 
lated. The reason is simple. 
The year 1900 was not a leap 
year. 

England did not adopt the 
Gregorian calendar until 1752 
and so I can only offer modifi- 
cations which will allow days 
between 1753 and 2099 to be 
calculated, The years 1800 
and 1900 were not leap 
years— the year 2000 will be a 
leap year. Modifications are 
as follows: 

6 GRAPHICS ia:P0SITI0K 4,4:? *4;'C 
ftLENDAR* 

7 POSITION 4,7i? 14;' 1753 TO IW 
% FOR 0=1 TO2fl08:NEXT 

335 IF YEAR<=19flfl THEN D=D+ ^ 

336 IF YEAR<=I888 THEN D=tHl 

355 JF YEAR=1?M AND 8=29 THEN B=2 

8 

354 IF YEAR=1&89 m &W THEN B=2 

3 

W IF D)=3 THEN 0=1 

Steve Tullett, 
Midlothian 



Dear Sir, 

After purchasing Issue 2 of 
your magazine, I felt that I 
must write to congratulate 
you and to send a subscrip- 
tion for the next six issues. 

I have a useful tip that you 
may wish to publish. Several 
of my friends also own Atari 
400's and it seems to be a 



common problem that after 
several hours use, the whole 
thing seizes up. The keyboard 
becomes inoperable and the 
machine refuses to LIST, RUN 
or even ERROR. As the 
System Reset key is also dis- 
abled the only way out is to 
switch off and start again, 
losing the resident program. 
To prevent this happening, at 
the start of your program 
POKE 832,6. Upon doing this I 
no longer had problems with 
a program which frequently 
disabled my machine. 

Tony Amesbury, 
Doncaster 

**!$ this reaiiy true! Could this 
be the fix for Atari 'lock-up' 
that everybody has been 
searching for? Perhaps some 
of the more technically 
minded readers could let us 
know what this POKE actually 
does. I can find no reference 
to it in any of the Memory 
Maps, 

Dear Sir, 

With regard to T. C. Mayers' 
letter in Issue 2 concerning 
difficulty in loading a pro- 
gram, I have some informa- 
tion which readers might find 
useful. 

Firstly, if you are having dif- 
ficulty in CLOADing a pro- 
gram and Error 143 or 140 
appears at the beginning 
when the program is about to 
load or, if after about a minute 
Error 138 or 143 appears, then 
note whether the CLOADing 
sound is a high-pitched tone 
or a low-pitched tone. If the 
tone is high then the com- 
puter is trying to read Data 



but there is nothing there. 
Rewind the tape and then 
advance it 1 count on the 
counter. If the same thing 
happens again then rewind 
and advance it another count 
and so on until you get it 
right. 

If the tone is low-pitched 
then the computer has begun 
reading Data part way 
through a program. This usu- 
ally happens when a pro- 
gram has been recorded in 
the middle of a tape. Again re- 
wind to where you started to 
CLOAD and advance the 
counter one count at a time 
until the program loads. 

, | hope that this will help 
some of your readers. As a 
final warning, don't leave 
your program recorder near a 
television speaker as this can 
de-magnetise the tape caus- 
ing a loss of all your pro- 
grams. 

Congratulations on a great 
magazine. Keep up the good 
work. 

Stuart Norse, 
Hoddlesdon, Lanes. 

Dear Les, 

Congratulations on a stea- 
dily improving magazine. 

Maplin of Southend, Essex, 
do upgrades on the 400. They 
also state that their uplift does 
not invalidate the Atari 
guarantee. I had my 400 con- 
verted in the same day. Very 
good service. I cannot say the 
same for their Annual Sub- 
sciption to Analog, at the 
moment they are two issues 



Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



behind. I am still waiting for 
issues 9 and 10 which have 
been on sale locally for over 
two months. I am several 
issues missing on Analog and 
Antic, any ideas where back 
issues can be obtained? 

With regard to tape prob- 
lems, where you get a fault in 
loading, I have found that by 
leaving the tape in the posi- 
tion where you have Saved or 
Loaded a program causes the 
pinch wheel to put a kink in 
the tape which will cause a 
faulty load, so always rewind 
your tape and release all keys 
on Ihe recorder. 

Excellent Graphics on the 
Cricket Maths program. Con- 
tinued success to the 
magazine. 

H. W. Clark, - 
Barking, Essex 

Dear Les, 

In answer to your call on 
Memory boards, I purchased 
my 400 in August 1981 with 
32 K fitted from new from 
Maplin. This board, although 
reliable, did cause the left half 
of the TV screen to have ver- 
tical lines. The degree of 
nuisance varied from pro- 
gram to program. As the com- 
puter was new to this country 
at the time, I assume that the 
board came from the States. I 
have now replaced this board 
with a 48K one made by 
Calisto. This has got rid of the 
vertical line problem and 
gives me a sharp fault-free 
picture. The shop I purchased 
the board from is called Vision 
Store in Kingston-upon- 



fhames. The reason I went 
there was solely due to the 
fact that a friend had his 
machine upgraded there, I 
went to 48K because I have a 
feeling that the price of Disk 
Drives is going to come down 
to a level that I can afford. 
Back to the board. After a few 
days it suddenly would only 
show Memo Pad mode 
whether it had Basic in or not. 
As the shop is not very near to 
me I decided to open it up and 
take a look. I found that one of 
the two extra wires that are 
soldered onto the cartridge 
connector was adrift and the 
other one fell off soon after. I 
did a quick soldering job and 
all was well. I wonder how 
many other computers have 
had shoddy soldering jobs 
done? 

John Shill, 
Farnborough, Hants. 

**From the rest of his letter it 
is obvious that John has 
some electronics knowledge 
and without this I would not 
advocate taking your Atari 
apart to check on faults, tfyou 
have problems ring the shop 
where you had an upgrade 
done and get them to fix it 
quickly. A good shop will help 
you. if you find delays in get- 
ting your machine back r com- 
plain. Several people have 
written to say that they still 
experience severe delays 
from Atari's new Service 
centres. If this is so complain 
directly to Atari in Slough and 
ring them two or three times a 
week until you get your 
machine back. If you sit back 
patiently, everyone wilt 



assume that you are happy to 
wait. A Company's reputation 
is built on Service and Atari 
took a step in the right direc- 
tion in setting up their Service 
centres, but they must be told 
by you — the customers — if 
there are still delays and 
problems. 

Dear PAGE 6, 

In First Steps you said that 
by pressing CTRL and 1 it 
stops the screen scrolling. 
This is true but it explains it 
very well in the Basic Refer- 
ence Manual — page 14. 

This must mean that you 
are saying the experts don't 
read their manuals. 

Nicholas Pearson, 
Selby, Yorks. 

**Quite right, Nicholas! Bill 
Wilkinson who wrote the Atari 
Basic language actually ad- 
mitted in his column in Com- 
pute f that he had his machine 
for over a year before some- 
one pointed out the CTRL 1 
feature I 



Please keep sending your 
letters on any subject, either 
in answer to queries raised by 
other readers or on matters 
that have not been covered 
before. Also send in any hints 
and tips that you feel might 
help other readers or amend- 
ments to any of the programs 
printed. Finally, we are run- 
ning short of smalt Demo 
programs and any short pro- 
grams demonstrating 
graphics or other functions 
would be appreciated. 



8 



PAGE 6 



Issue 4 



Lunar V 

Stan Ockers, Illinois, U.S.A. 

With Player Missile Graphics it is possible to 
move images you create around the screen 
independent of what is displayed as 
background. This is done with very little 
calculation. Changing a single memory location 
will move the entire image horizontally while 
moving bytes up and down in memory will 
move the image vertically. 

I've developed a set of machine language 
routines which can be called from Basic to 
assist in missile graphic movement. These are 
not necessarily the best and certainly not the 
only way of doing missile graphics, but I hope 
what I've come up with will help others in 
developing programs. 

I'll cover only enough to get started in this 
article. I placed the routines in the unused 
portion of memory in page six and have 
reserved some locations at the top of page six, 
You often have to remember vertical and 
horizontal positions of players. Table 1 lists 
locations for this. Also listed are locations 
storing pointers to areas of memory used to 
hold player images. These have to be 
calculated because they depend on the size of 
memory in your machine. 

MISS Plyr. 3 Plyr. 2 Plyr. 1 Plyr. 

Horizontal 1788 1787 1786 1785 1784 

Position 53252 53251 53250 53249 53248 

Vertical 1783 1782 1781 1780 1779 

Position 

High Byte 1778 1777 1776 1775 1774 

Memory Vector 

Low Byte 1773 1772 1771 1770 1769 

Mem ory Vector 



Perhaps the best way to explain what is 
going on is through an actual program. The 
listing is from a program called Lunar V. The 
machine language subroutines are poked into 
memory in lines 30-44. Line 36 contains a 
subroutine used to load zero page locations 
0OCB and OOCC with the start of memory 
assigned to player X. Players are numbered to 
4 with player 4 being missiles. At line 38 is a 
routine which places bytes representing player 



X into memory at the appropriate spot. It is 
called using the USR function in the form 
A=U5R{1606,X,ADDR}. ADDR is the decimal 
address where player image bytes are stored. 
The routine will keep loading bytes until a zero 
byte is found. It picks up the vertical position 
(increasing down from the top of the screen) 
from 1779,X. The load player routine does not 
erase what is already there. This is done by a 
routine poked in at line 44 and called by 
A=USR07G6,X), 

Major routines move the player vertically. 
A=USR(1637.X) poked into memory by lines 40 
and 41, moves him downscreen and 
A=USR(1673,X) in lines 42 and 43 move him 
upscreen. Traps are included to keep from 
roaming into another player's area of memory. 
These can also be used to limit the vertical 
motion of players. Change the 126 at 1678 
(make it lower), or the 1 at 1683 (make it 
higher). 

Setting pointers for player memory is done in 
line 50. These are for double line resolution 
meaning each byte will cover two scan lines on 
the TV. You could get smoother motion using 
single line resolution, but double line resolution 
is simpler for now. The 4 page gap (1 K) between 
the end of player memory locations and the 
end of RAM is used by the operating system for 
display purposes, the amount used depends on 
the graphics mode. 

Lines 60 and 63 poke data for images into 
memory. The images (in order) are the lander, 
the flame and the crater. Various portions of the 
flame are used depending on the thrust (see 
line 195). Images are stored in an unused 
portion of memory at the beginning of the 
missile graphics area, ^_ • 

/ believe that Lunar V was Stan Ocker's first 
program submitted to the A.C.E. Newsletter in 
June 1981. Stan has come a long way since 
then but I hope that this article and program 
will provide readers who do not understand yet 
about Vertical Blank interrupts, with a better 
understanding of player missile graphics. See if 
you can improve the program, there is plenty ot 
scope, and send in your revised efforts. 



Is$je4 



PAGE 6 



i rem xxsxxxxxxxxxxxxmxmxmxxxs 

2 REM * LUNAR U X 

3 REM X by * 

4 REM X STAN OCKERS * 

5 REM * from ACE NEWSLETTER, EUGENE X 

6 REM X OREGON, U.S.A. X 

7 REM xxxsxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

IB DEM M*(29) iPOKE 559,8 
20 REM POKE MISSILE -OR. ROUTINES 
30 FOR 1=1594 TO 1728:READ A:POKE I ,A: 
NEXT I 

36 DATA 170, 189,233,6, 133,283,139,238, 
6,133,204,96 

38 DATA 104, 104, 104,32,58,6, 104, 133,20 
6,104,133,205,138,243,6,162,0,161,205, 
201 ,0,240,7, 145,203,230,265,200 

39 DATA 283,243,96 

40 DATA 194,104,104,32,58,6,188,243,6, 
200, 192, 126, 176,21, 177, 203, 208, 247*136 
,177,283,240,6,208, 145,283,136 

41 DATA 208,245,280, 145, 203, 254,243,6, 
96 

42 DATA 184,104,104,32,58,6,138,243,6, 
192, 1,248, 19,208,1,200, 177,20 3,248,6,1 
36, 145,203,208,283,245,136, 145 

43 DATA 203,222,243,6,96 

44 DATA 184, I84 f 104 f 32, 58, 6, 168,0, 152, 
' 145,283,200,16,251,96 

48 REM X UECTORS FOR PLAYER MEM X 

58 A=PEEKM06>-3;POKE 54279, A:POKE 177 

4,A+2:P0KE 1775, A+2 :POKE l769 f 8:POKE 1 

?70,128!START«*256*A 

58 REM * POKE IMAGE DATA X 

68 FOR I=START TO START t 23: READ A: POKE 

I ,A:NEXT 1 
62 DATA 3,48,126,195,126,60,24,126,165 
,129,8,90,98,66,36,36,36,24,24,24,0,24 
,60,126,255,126,60,24,8 
98 REM X INITIALISE UARIABLES X 
108 ALT=4500:FUEL=8S8:GRAU=5:THRUST=5; 
FRACT=8 . 1 :UEL-8 : EMPTY=B :N= 10 : LN- 1 1 :POK 
E 53257, 8: POKE 559, 34: GRAPH I CS 17 
102 TRAP 186 

184 REM X MAIN LOOP STARTS HERE X 
165 POKE 53275, 2 i POKE 77,0: IF H>\ THEN 

120 

110 REM X DRAW MOUNTAINS IF N= 1 X 

111 RESTORE 118 

112 FOR J=l TO SiREAD X,Y,L,ft:FOR 1=8 
TO L:POSITION X+I,Y-I*? *6;CHR*< 143) :N 
EXT IMPOSITION X+L,Y-L:? #6;CHR*(254) 

114 FOR 1=1 TO R:POSITION X+L,Y-L+I:? 
tt6 }CHR*< 252) : NEXT I : NEXT J;F0R 1=8 TO 
IMPOSITION 1,22:? #6:CHRS< 141) 
116 NEXT I 

113 DATA 8,17,3,4,6,16,4,5,13,13,5,1,1 
,22,3,3,12,22,5,2 

119 REM X ERASE PREU. STARS X 

128 RESTORE 1058+LN 

122 READ X,Y:IF X=8 THEN 126 

124 POSITION X,Y:? #6;* ' :GOTO 122 



125 REM X DRAW NEW STARS X 

126 RESTORE 1858+N 

127 READ X,Y:IF X=8 THEN 132 

129 POSITION X,Y:? H6;CHR$( 170) :GOTO 1 
27 

130 REM X INSTRUMENT LABELS X 

132 POSITION 0,8:? *6* "ALT=" : POSITION 
17,8:? «6;"FUEL=- :POS1TION 8,23:? H6;* 
UEL=" 

134 REM X INITIALISE MISSILE GRAPHICS 
X 

135 POKE 559, 46: POKE 53277,3 

138 REM X LANDER POS. AND COLOR X 

148 POKE 53243, 128: POKE 1779, 10: POKE 7 

04,288 

148 REM X FLAME POS. AND COLOR X 

150 POKE 53249, 128 SPOKE 1780,21 iPOKE 7 

85, 6S 

183 REM X ERASE OLD - DRAW LANDER X 

190 A=USRU706,6> :A=USR< 1706, 1) :POKE 1 
738,PEEK<: 1779) + 1 1 :A"USRt 1686,8 , ST ART) 

191 REM X SKIP FLAME 48V; OF TIME X 
3 92 IF RNDC8)>0.6 THEN 288 

195 FLAME=START+20-INT< THRUST) :A=USR( 1 
686,1, FLAME) 

193 REM X UPDATE UARIABLES X 
208 hCCEL=THRUST-GRAU 
228 UEL=UEL+FRACTXACCEL 
248 ALT=ALT+FRACTXUEL 
258 REM X TEST FOR SURFACE X 
268 IF ALT<8'THEN POSITION 5,0 r- J tt6; p 8 
":GOTO 980 

238 FUEL=FUEL-FRACTXTHRUST 
290 REM X TEST FOR FUEL GONE X 
388 IF FUEL<0 THEN F ULL = :EMPTr= 1 ;THRU 
ST=8 

498 IF EMPTY- 1 THEN 558 
495 REM UPDAT THRUST WITH STICK X 
500 S=STICK(0) 
510 IF 3=15 THEN THRUST=0 
528 IF S^ 13 (WD THRUSK? THEN THRUST=T 
HRUST+8.5 

548 REM X UPDATE POSITION X 
558 SOUND I,25,4,THRUST:YP0S=(NX458"AL 
T)/5+18:P0KE 1779, f POS: POKE J780,YPOS+ 
11 

590 REM X PRINT UARIABLES X 
600 POSITION 5,0:? #6: INT<ALT> ; '" " :POS 
IT ION 4,23;? «6;INT(UEL) i H "iPOSITION 
17,0:? tt6;[NT(FUEL) ;" h 
605 REM X TEST FOR NEW SCREEN X 
610 IF YPOS>188 THEN LN=N:N=N- 1 iYPOS=l 
0IGOTO 105 

628 IF YPOS<18 THEN LN=N:N=N+ 1 :YPOS= 18 
8:G0T0 185 

69B REM X REDO MAIN LOOP X 
708 GOTO 190 

898 REM X TEST FOR LOSING X 
980 SOUND 1,0,0,8;IF UEL<-10 THEN 950 

901 REM X LANDED SAFELY X 

902 A=USRa706,l) I 



10 



Lunar V continued 



PAGE 6 



Issue4 



995 POSITION 9,2:M*="HISSIQN CONTROL:' 
:G0SUB 1960:^ #6; " " :M*= W LU^R V HAS LA 
NDED.*:GOSUB 1090 

910 M*=" CONGRATULATIONS ON" :GOSUB 1000 
:M**="A PERFECT FLIGHT !':GQSUB 100«:GO 
TO 9B0 

943 REM * CRASHED * 

950 A=USR( 1706,0) :A^USR( 1706, 1) :A=USR( 
1606, 1,START+21> : FOR J~l TO 3:P0KE 532 
57,1: POKE 53257,3 

952 SOUND 0, 100,4, 14s POKE 5324?, 120 :P0 
KE 53257,1 :FOR 1=1 TO 30 l NEXT I : SOUND 
1,140,4,14:POKE 53249,116 

954 POKE 53257, 3: FOR I~t TO 38 :NEXT I: 
SOUND 0,0 S 0,0:SOUND i^0,0,0:NEXT JtPOK 
E 705,6 

955 POSITION 0,2:M4="MISSION CONTROLS 
:G03UB 1000:? #6;"" :M*~"LUNAR U WENT 
UT OF n :GOSUB 1009 

969 M*="CONTROL AND DUG A H sGOSUB 1990: 
? «6;"CRATER H \ INT(ABS(MEL>*3> ;" FEET" 

:M*="INTO THE MOON' S" :GGSUB 1909 

970 M*= " SURFACE. ■ :GOSUB 1009 
975 REM * TEST FOR START KEY £ 

980 IF PEEK(S3279)=6 THEN POKE 559,6 :P 

OKE 53277, 5GOTO 199 

999 GOTO 980 

99? REM * MESSAGE SUBROUTINE * 

1909 FOR 1=1 TO LEN<M*3-1:? #6jr»CI,I) 

;:SOUND ,50 , 10,8;FOR J=l TO 19;NEXT J 

:SOUND 0,0,6,9'FOR J-l TO 19:NEXT J 

1019 NEXT I:? #6;M*a ,[> : RETURN 

1059 REM * CATA FOR STARS" * 

1951 DATA 1,4,7,11,16,5,0 

1952 DATA 2»4 ,6, 19 , 15^3,5,5,5, 16,9 

1954 DATA 8,3,12,7,18,13,2,1,16,2,0 

1955 DATA 7,7,10,19,17,3,9 
105c DATA 4,2,7,13,17,4,13,15,0 
1857 DATA 5,3,14,14,12,9,2,13,0 
1053 DATA 1,2,18,4,13,13,11,1,5,15,0 
1059 DATA 5,3,19,4,14,10,3,14,13,18,0 
1069 DATA 5,2,19,7,9,16,1,7,16,13,0 
1861 DATA 8,3,9, 15, 15,2,0 

1062 DATA 2,2,9,9, 19,4,9 

1063 DATA 9,3,1,5,16,14,9,0 , 



WHOOPS!... ERROR M 

Like all the quality magazines, we need a 
blunders corner sometimes which we will call 
ERROR 17 {look it up in your Manual I). 

Only one error reported from Issue 3. In line 
10005 of Cricket Maths the last statement 
should be TRAP 10000 NOT TRAP 100- You will 
need to use abbreviations to get it in. 



User Groups/Contact 

The User Group network is beginning to build 
up. See previous Issues for details of User 
Groups in MERSEYSIDE, EDINBURGH, 
PRESTON and NORTH WALES. If you have 
formed a User Group or want to form one in 
your area, let us know and we will happily 
publish details. Once you have got a group 
running, keep in touch and let PAGE 6 know 
how you are faring. 

LEA VALLEY ATARI USERS GROUP — No 
details of when or where they meet but get in 
touch with 

MATTHEW TYDEMAN, VICE-PRESIDENT 

LEA VALLEY ATARI USERS GROUP, 

125CADMORE LANE 

CHESHUNT 

HERTS. 

NORWICH USERS GROUP — Following the 
mention in the last issue, Ken and Sherry Ward 
have got enough people together to form a 
User Group. Not only that, Ken has managed to 
produce a Newsletter— NUGGET-Hwhich looks 
quite promising, for more details get in touch 

with 

KEN WARD 

45 COLEBURN ROAD 

LAKENHAM 

NORWICH 

Tel.: 0603 661149 

Finally, a couple of people who are suffering 
from lack of time or problems in typing in all 
the listings in the magazines. 

STEVE GUNN of 16 LEVERTON GREEN, 
CLIFTON ESTATE, NOTTINGHAM NG11 BBS, is 
finding that there is not enough time to type in 
everything and would like to swap disks or 
tapes of magazine listings. 

K. DAY of 70 NIGHTINGALE ROAD, 
CARSHALTON, SURREY SM5 2EN, would like 
some help in getting programs from the 
American magazines to run, particularly 
'STARSHOT' from a recent COMPUTE! Get in 
touch if you can help. 
STOP PRESS....STDP PRESS 

P.A.C.E KQW MEET AT IKG0L LABOUR CLUB f 
WHITBY AVEKUE t INGOL EVERY SECOND 
WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH. 






Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



11 



ARCADE ACTION 

Harvey Kong Tin, Hull 



ZAXXON 

DATASOFT 

1 PLAYER 



game — it is still a reasonable playable 3-D 
game for the Atari and will amaze those who 
have not heard of Zaxxon before. 



16KCASS. 
32K DISK 



This is an adaptation of a popular 3-D arcade 
game for the Atari 400/800 computers. You are 
the pilot of a spacefighter craft that flies 
through a heavily defended space fortress in 
pursuit of the robot Zaxxon. You have to fly 
through gaps in walls and choose to shoot fuel 
dumps (which when hit refuels your own craft), 
tank guns, radar dishes, parked enemy fighters 
or avoid them, After your first pass through, 
you face enemy fighters flying in outer-space. 
Having survived you take on the fortress again, 
this time with high walls and force-fields. Low 
onfuel you have to shoot what fuel dumps you 
can and then position your craft at the right 
height to pass through the narrow gaps 
between the walls and force-fields. At the back 
of the fortress lies the Zaxxon robot with its 
deadly homing missile. All you need is six 
direct hits on Zaxxon to destroy it. Having done 
so, you have cycled through one complete 
phase of Zaxxon, ready to take on the next 
difficulty level. 

The arcade game has a very heavily armed 
fortress, complete with missile silos, and 
buildings — these added features are missing on 
the home computer version, and instead of a 3- 
D dogfight in outer-space with enemy fighters, 
this is compromised into a 2-D battle. In the 
arcade, Zaxxon is a huge fearsome robot, but it 
has shrunk in size for the Atari computer. The 3- 
D flying difficulty is present as in the arcade, 
but the fortress is somewhat barren in 
comparison — this will disappoint arcade- 
followers of the game who will keep going back 
to the arcade machines to play this visually 
stunning game. There is also the De-luxe 
version in the arcades with its cute dragon to 
fight 

Datasoft has not produced a faithful 
adaptation of the Sega game and this will 
disappoint many unaware buyers of the 



QIX 

ATARI 
1 PLAYER 



16K ROM 



This straight adaptation of the arcade game is 
bound to please those wanting a game that is 
so very different from the very many space 
shoot-em-up games. The object of the game is 
to draw boxes covering 75% of the screen and 
any percentage over 75 is awarded x 1000 
points. You start off with three markers and 
move on to a new screen when 75% or more is 
covered. 

Your marker can draw lines but must avoid 
the Qix {a helix that flies in space) while 
drawing — if it touches an unfinished line or 
you, you lose a marker. Along with the Qix you 
have to avoid two sparx — who travel along the 
lines. Simply go out and draw something when 
they are approaching. The sparx multiply 
beyond a certain time limit. 

Normally you have fast draw (the boxes are 
coloured blue) and can choose slow draw by 
keeping the trigger pressed while drawing (the 
boxes are coloured brown) for double points. 
Hesitate in your drawing and you start off a 
fuse at the beginning of your line. To stop it, 
keep moving. Draw yourself a spiral and you 
end up in a death trap. 

Once you have filled up two screens, you face 
two Qix — separate them somehow with a line 
and you start again with points doubled. 
Separate the two Qix again and the points are 
trebled, and so on. 

The graphics of the game are very simple but 
the sounds are pleasing and unique — just like 
the arcade. Because you are free to draw any 
rectangular shapes that you think might work, 
this is a game of strategy and planning. After a 
while you will find that filling in 90% of the 
screen is not too difficult but 98% or 99% takes 
some planning and luck. 



12 



PAGE 6 



Issue 4 



Merlin's Magic Square 

Steve Hutton, West Midlands 

Merlin's Magic square is an entertaining little program to 
test your logic skills. Instructions for play are included on the 
screen. 

The program listing contains plenty of REMarks for you to 
follow. Pay particular attention to the inverse spaces required 
in lines 350 to 370. If you want to change the colour of the 
screen, alter the SETCOLOR statement in line 30. Also adding 
SETCOLOR 1,0,14 will brighten up the display. 



is rem ms*mm*mmm**msm 

11 REM I MERLIN'S MAGIC SQUARE 31 

12 REM K BY STEVE HURON K 

13 REM K 13/1/33 * 

ia rem imimimmmmmmm 

15 POKE 764,255 

28 REM KH CLEAR SCREEN AND INHIBIT 

THE PURSER 

38 ? CHR*U25) :P0KE 752,1: SETCOLOR 2,2 

,1:CLfl 

48 REJUS* PRINT TITLE, INSTRUCTIONS 

AND COUNTER 

50 POSITION 8,3:? 'MERLIN'S MAGIC SGUA 

RE' 

68 POSIT ION 3,8:? 'PRESS IMPOSITION 

2,9t? 'TO HAKE THE^POSITION 4,18:? ' 
NUMBERS' 
78 POSITION 4,11:? 'LIGHT UP' (POSITION 

3,12:? 'OR SO OUT' 

88 POSITION 27,8s? 'THE OBJECT" :P0SITI 
ON 2*,?:? "OF THE GAME' :PQSIT ION 26,11 

i? "IS TO LIGHT" 

98 POSITION 27,11:? 'OP ALL THE^POSIT 

ION 27,12i'' 'NUMBERS IN" 

160 POSITION 26, S3:? "AS FEW MGUES*:PQ 
SITION 26,14:? 'AS POSSIBLE": POSIT ION 
6,18;? "NUMBER OF HOUES TAKEN = ' 

119 REM m SET UP IWffiOM SQUARE 

128 2=9:DIH SQ(9) 

138 FOR 0*1 TO 9 

148 2=2 H 

1S8 IF Z-i THEN Ap15:B=7:C=8:D=9 

168 IF 2*2 THEN A= 18 

178 IF 2=3 THEN A=21 

188 IF 2=4 THEN A=1S:B=18!OI1:0=12 

198 IF 2-5 THEN A=18 

286 IF 2=6 THEN A=21 

219 IF Z=7 THEN A=15iB= 13:014:0= 15 

226 IF 2=B THEN A=18 

238 IF 1=9 THEN A=21 

248 Y=INT(RND<8H2):SQ(G>K 

259 IF Y=fl THEN GOSUB 388 

268 IF Y=l THEN GOSUB 358 

278 NEXT Q 



275 SOUND 8,68,18,8 
238 GOTO 398 

m REM * SET UP RND S9R<0FF=8) 
388 POSITION A,Bi? CHR*(137);CHR*(149) 
;CHR*{H3) 

31B POSITION A,C:? CHRt(25> ;Z;CHRtU53 
) 

328 POSITION A,D:? CHR*C 139) ;CHR*(21> ; 
CHRt( 148) 
338 RETURN 

348 REM I SET UP RNO SQR(Ct^l) 
358 POSITION A*B;? " *:REM IW/ERSE S 
PACES 

368 POSITION A,Cs? " ";CHR»( 176+Z) ;" * 
:REM INUERSE SPACES 

378 POSITION A,D:? ' "jREM INVERSE S 
PACES 
388 RETURN 
' 382 GOSUB 658 
385 REM m THIS SECTION DEALS WITH 
THE KEYS 1-9 

398 N1-31iN2=38iN3=26;N4=24:N5=2?:N6*2 
7iN?=51:N8=53:N9=48:N18=0 
488 POSITION 38,13;? N 18 
418 P=PEEK(764):IF P=255 THEN 418 
428 IF P=Ni THEN N18=H18H: GOSUB 997 
438 IF P=N2 THEN N18=N1BH:G0SUS 1998 
448 IF P=N3 THEN N 1 8=N 18+ 1; GOSUB 2997 
458 IF P=«4 THEN N14=MM>1:G0SUB 3998 
468 IF P=N5 THEM N16=N18M:G0SUB 4996 
478 IF P=N6 THEN N18=*I 16+1: GOSUB 5998 
488 IF P=N? THEN N18=N18*1:60$UB 69?? 
498 IF P=N8 THEN N18=N 18 H: GOSUB 7998 
588 IF P=N9 THEN NJB=N]0+hG0SUB 8997 
518 POKE 764,255:G0SUB 658 
520 IF N 18=3 THEN GOSUB 548 
538 GOTO 488 
548 FOR N=8 TO 12 
558 FOR 0=2 TO 12 
568 POSITION U,W:? " ' 
570 NEXTU 
588 NEXT M 
598 FOR N*8 TO 14 
608 FOR U=26 TO 37 



610 POSITION U,N:? " ■ 
628 NEXT U 
638 NEXT N 
648 RETURN 

658 IP S0(1)=1 AND SQ£2)=1 AND SJO=l 
AND SQ(4>-1 M SQ(5)=1 THEN GOSUB 67 

I 

668 RETURN 

678 IF S9<6)=1 AND SG(7)=1 AND SG<8>=1 
AND SQ(?>=1 THEN GOTO 685 
688 RETURN 

685 POSITION 38,18:? N18 
698 FOR 1=1 TO 4 
708 FOR H=208 TO 158 STEP -1 
718 SOUND 8,H,18,8 
728 NEXT H 
730 NEXT I 
740 SOUND 8, H, 19, 8 
750 GOSUB 540 

768 POSITION 3,9:? 'SUCCESS! ' 
778 POSITION 4,11:? "WHY NOT" 
788 POSITION 5,121' "PLAY" 
798 POSITION 4,13:? 'AGAIN ?' 
898 POSITION 27,9;? "PRESS ANT 
828 POSITION 28,18:'' "KEY TO" 
830 POSITION 28,11;' 'START A" 
849 POSITION 27,12:? "NEW GAME.' 
356 P=PEEK(764):IF P=255 THEN 850 
368 IF P<)255 THEN GOTO 15 
??6 REM m KEY NUMBER 1 PRESSED 

997 GOSUB 2800 

998 GOSUB 4088 

999 GOSUB 5988 

1888 SOUND 0,162,19,8 

1019 A=i5:fr7:C=3;D=9:Z=1 

1828 IF S0(i>=8 THEN GOSUB 358 

1038 IFSXM1)=i THEN GOSUB 388 

1848 IF SOU)=0 THEN S3(1)=J:GOT0 1868 

1850 IF SQ(1)=1 THEN SQU)=8 

I860 SOUND 8,162,18,8 

1878 RETUI^I 

1997 REM Ui KEY NUHBER 2 PRESSED 

1998 GOSUB 1008 

1999 GOSUB 3008 

2000 SOUND 9,144,19,8 
2818 A= 183^7 :C=S:D=9iZ=2 
2029 IF SO(2>=0 THEN GOSUB 358 
2836 IF SQ(2)=1 THEN GOSUB 388 

2848 IF S9<2)=e THEN SQ(2)=1:GOT0 ?068 
2856 IF SQ<2>=] THEN SO<2)=0 
2868 SOUND 9,144,19,6 
2078 RETUfN 

2996 REM m KEY NUMBER 3 PRESSED 

2997 GOSUB 2888 

2998 GOSUB 5986 

jmmBm GOTOPAGE27 



' 



Calisto Computers Ltd. 

119 JOHN BRIGHT STREET, BIRMINGHAM. Tel: 021-632 6458 



13 



THE BEST OF ATARI SOFTWARE 



NO 1 ADvENrUHFLANO 

MO J PIRATE AOrtNlURF 

ISO 3 MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 

ISO 4 VOODOO CASTLE 

NO * THIE COUNT 

NO. ft STRANGE ODYSSEY 

NO. 7 MTSTEflf FUN HOUSt 

NO. ft PYRAMID OF DOOM 

NO 3 GHOSI TOWN 

NO IS SAVAGE ISLAN0 Bin 1 

NO 1 1 SAVAGE ISLAHO pin 2 

NO 12QOlLD€N VQVAGE 

5 A II. A I AOVENTURELAND 

S.A G.A 1 PIRATE ADVENTURE 

SEA MUGON 

SEA WAGON 

STFtATOS 

STfiATOS 

THE CURSE OF CROWLEV MANOR 

fSCAPE f RUM TRAAM 

bAftTHtjLlAKE 1306 
BASIC ROUTINES 
BASIC ROUTINE; 
i: $*et 
REAR ijljARQ 
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ELIMINATOR 
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tutu mum 

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5UNDAT COtlf 

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C.R.I S. 

91 NUCLEAR BOMBER 

I DHDS OF KARMA 

ANPHOMEQA CONQUEST 

Dniepfr river LiME 
EMFiflE Of THE aVE«Mi**0 
GUNS Of FORI MEFIANCE 
LtGOWUM 

MOON PATHOL 
PLANET MINERS 
li F 5 SORCERESS 
TANK AHKADE 
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CAVES Of UfATTt 
MURDER AT AWESOME HALL 
BOMB HUNTER 
HJMHLEHlKiB 
CANTON CLIMBER 
CANYON CLIMBER 
SHOOTING ARCADE 
ShODTINU ARCADE 
PACIFIC COAST HIQHWAr 
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY 
CLOWNS* BALLOONS 
CLOWN* * FJALIOONS 



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5AN0S OF EGYPT 
THE CONSTRUCTOR 
IAXXQH 

ZAxmn 

graphic master 
graphic generator 
basic compiler 
t1xt w1zzaho 

VENU5 VOYAflEB 

CRUSH CRUMBLE & ChQmp 

CRUSH CRUMBLE & ChQM* 

ASTnOCHASE 

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FLOY& OF THE JUNGLE 

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f LOTH OF TW JUNGLE 

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WBMOOf won 

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TUTORIAL i DISPLAY U5T5 

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TUTORIAL 4 ANIMATION 

TUTORIAL 5 PLAYER MIS3IUS 

I 'J rORIAI f 50UNC 

TUTORIAL 7 CNSC UTlUTliS 

SHAMUS 

SHAMOS 

dCNic PAHAKOIA 

PROItCTCR 

protector h 

claim jumper 

Claim jumper 

fo«t apocalypse 

SURVIVOR 

NAAJTKUS 

NAJJTN.U5 

Slime 

HUME 

6ANOITS 

WAVOUT 



ATARI HARDWARE 

ATARI 400 f 16K Standard) with Basic 
ATARI {48K Standard* 800 
ATARI 310 IDiac Drive) 
ATARI 410 (Cassette Recorder) 
32K EXPANSION! for ATARI 4C0 
48K EXPANSION for ATARI 400 
MOVING KEYBOAHD for ATARI 400 
PAIR of ATARI JOYSTICKS 
WfCO JOYSTICK 
WICO TRACBALL 



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THE ATARI ASSEMBLER 
BASIS EXERCISES FOR THE ATARI 
NEWBRAIN TECHNICAL MANUAL 
DE RE ATARI 

PROGRAMMING THE 6502 
MAPPING THE ATARI 
ATARI GRAPHICS 



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■— 



14 



PAGE 6 



Issue4 



Memory Mapped Screens 

Phil Griffin, West Midlands 



Screen displays are normally set up on an 
Atari computer by using the PRINT, PLOT, 
DRAWTO and FILL instructions. This may be 
adequate in most situations but at some stage 
you may find that the cursor Is out of range, for 
example if you are using redefined display lists, 
or that you need extra speed of execution for 
simple animation sequences. These problems 
can be overcome by taking advantage of the 
Atari's memory mapped screen. 

In each Graphics mode the screen is split into 
memory locations which are directly 
addressable by the POKE and PEEK 
instructions. The number of locations on the 
screen is dependent on the Graphics mode in 
use and each location is assigned a memory 
address which may vary according to the 
Graphics mode selected. 

The lowest screen memory location is in the 
top left corner of the screen and its address is 
contained in the Operating System at locations 
88 and 89. The program below will give the 
start address of the screen memory locations 
for any Graphics mode represented by 'n r . 
Simply replace 'n' by the number of the 
Graphics mode you wish to use. 

10 GRAPHICS n:TLn=PEEK(88>+256*PEEK(89) 

Subsequent screen locations are numbered 
sequentially from left to right across the screen 
in rows. The contents of locations 88 and 89 
alter depending on which Graphics mode is 
specified and also depending on the amount of 
RAM that the computer has installed. For this 
reason it's best to assign the first screen 
location to a variable and relate any other 
screen locations to this, e.g. 

TL2JL2 + 20,TL2 + 1 50 etc. 

Table 1 shows the total number of screen 
memory locations for each Graphics mode 
available from the Operating System. Graphics 
modes 1 to 8 inclusive have an optional text 
window which can be suppressed by adding 16 
to the Graphics mode number selected. The 
resultant total number of screen memory 
locations for each mode is also shown in the 
table. 



Any whole number value between and 255 
can be put into a screen memory location by 
means of the POKE instruction. Precisely what 
you get on the screen after POKEing a location 
depends on the Graphics modefs) in use. 
Graphics Modes 0, 1 & 2 give characters from 
the internal set, whilst the remaining modes 
give sequences of coloured pixels. The 
Graphics Modes can be grouped as follows: 

GRAPHICS MODE DISPLAY 

0, 1 & 2 Internal Character Set 

3, 5&7 Three colour Graphics 

+ background 

4, 68c 8 Single colour Graphics 

+ background 
9, 10 & 11 Multi-colour/Luminance Graphics 
(of limited value in this context) 



Mtxfe 


SCTHfl 

Wemory 

PftfMods 
Lin* 


Number oi 

Mode Unw 

With Without 

T«xt Twt 

Window Window 


Total Nurnber of Screw* 
Moiflory Locations 
Wfth Without 

TflKt Twt 

Window Window 





40 


N/A 


24 


N/A 


960 


1 


20 


20 


24 


400 


480 


2 


20 


10 


12 


200 


240 


3 


10 


20 


24 


200 


240 


4 


10 


40 


48 


400 


460 


5 


20 


40 


48 


800 


900 


6 


20 


80 


96 


1600 


1920 


7 


40 


80 


96 


3200 


3840 


8 


40 


160 


192 


6400 


7680 


9 


40 


N/A 


192 


N/A 


7680 


10 


40 


N/A 


192 


N/A 


7680 


11 


40 


N/A 


192 


N/A 


7680 



TABLE t 

NOTE: The Text Window consists of 4 mode 
lines of Graphics 0. The start and finish 
locations for the Text Window will always be 
TLO+800 and TL0+959 respectively. 

GRAPHICS MODES 0, 1 & 2 

These are the modes which utilise the 
standard character set within the computer's 
Operating System and each screen memory 
location is equivalent in size to that required to 
display a character. 



Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



15 



Graphics Mode 

This mode gives a single colour character set 
and the full range of characters available can be 
shown by the following short program; 

18 GRAPHICS 0:TLG=PEEK(88)+2543PEEK(8? 
) iPOKE 752,1 

20 FOR 1=0 TO 255: POKE TL6+ I ,1 :NEXT I 
30 GOTO 39 



The value to be poked for each character is 
the same as the number shown in the Table 9-6 
(Page 55) of the Basic Reference Manual 
(supplied with the Basic Language Cartridge). 
To obtain the Inverse Video of a character add 
128 to the value shown in the table. 

Graphics Modes 1 & 2 

These Modes give the option of the normal 
character set in a choice of four colours, Inverse 
video characters are not available in these 
Modes and in order to obtain characters 64 to 
127 in Table 9-6 a POKE 756,226 instruction 
must be used. The range of characters available 
can be displayed by substituting GRAPHICS 1 
for GRAPHICS (line 10) andTU forTLO (lines 
10 and 20) in the program above. Characters 64 
to 127 can be shown by adding the following 
line to the program: 

15 POKE 756,226 



PRICE INCREASE 

You will have noticed that the cover price of 
PAGE 6 has been increased to 75p, 
Unfortunately this has been necessary as it was 
becoming obvious that the magazine could not 
survive much longer at the old price. The 
choice was simple— increase the subscription 
and cover price or stop publishing the 
magazine. From all of your letters I am sure that 
almost everybody would have been 
disappointed if they could no longer read PAGE 
6 and I hope therefore that you will continue to 
support the magazine at the new price. Think 
what you get — a whole magazine devoted to 
Atari for the same price (or less} than you pay 
for a glossy magazine with only one Atari 
program or article. The way is open now — with 
your help and contributions — to get bigger and 
better. Tell your friends. 



DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM 

The accompanying short program 'SPIDER' 
shows how a character can be moved around 
the screen with a joystick by POKEing values to 
screen locations. The program is only a 
demonstration but, with a little bit of ingenuity, 
it could be used to form the basis of a game. 

i rem ***********spider************* 

2 REM * MOVEMENT BY POKEING SCREEN * 

3 REM * LOCATIONS: USE JOYSTICK IN * 

4 REM * PORT NO 1 * 

5 REM ****************************** 
10 POKE 752,1:? CHR*( 125) :TL0=PEEK(88) 

+256*PEEK(8?) :SETC0L0R 2,3,6:SETC0L0R 

1,0,0 

28 A=TL0+21?:CHK=TL0+29B:B=TL0 

38 POKE B,0:POKE A,10:B=A 

40 S=ST!CK(0) :IF S=1I THEN A=A-1:IF A< 

CHK THEN A^CHK 

50 IF S=7 THEN A=A+1:IF A>CHK+3? THEN 

A=CHK+3? 

60 IF S=14 THEN A=A-40 ;CHK=CHK-40 ; IF C 

HK<TL0 THEN CHK=TL0 :A-A+40 

70 IF S-13 THEN A=A+48 :CHK=CHKM0 : I F C 

HK>TL0 + 920 THEN CHK=CHK-48 :Af^A-40 

80 IF S=15 THEN 40 

96 GOTO 30 

In the next issue of PAGE 6, I'll deal with 
Graphics Modes 3 to 8 and demonstrate some 
other effects which can be generated with a 
memory mapped screen. 



Software Reviews 

XENON RAID by English Software Company. 
Space action game with lots of player-missiles 
over a stationary but well-conceived 
background. Docking sequences after you fight 
off each wave. Fairly difficult. 32K cassette. 

ACE. THE ATAftl CASSETTE ENHANCER. 

Sounds almost too good to be true. Allows you 
to name cassette-saved programs and then 
search through the tape to load the program of 
your choice. Verifies saved programs!!! 
Renumbers program. Automatic line 
numbering plus much more. All this at £7.95! 
Definitely a full review in the next issue. If it 
does all it claims then this could be the one 
program that no cassette owner should be 
without. * 



16 



PAGE 6 



Issue 4 



Basic . . . 



David Harry, West Midlands 



Basic programs, which are all I can write, 
sometimes run more slowly than I would like, 
so I try to incorporate any time-saving devices 1 
can. Often there is more than one way to 
achieve the same effect — for example, GR.O ? 
r Y r and ? CHR$(125) all clear the screen. This 
simple timing routine will enable you to find 
out which of the routines you can use is faster 
and whether there is any saving or penalty in 
memory usage. It uses a FOR-NEXT loop to 
execute your piece of code 1000 times but if 
that is too long, change the value of R in line 
3000, 



1 REM %M 



IMPORTANT 



*S* 



2 REM * BEFORE TYPING IN THE LISTING * 

3 REM * TYPE FRE(8) * 

4 REM X WITH DOS BOOTED IF YOU ARE * 

5 REM i USING DISK. THE VALUE RETURNED* 

6 REM * SHOULD BE USED AS THE VALUE * 

7 REM * FOR Ml IN LINE 1006 S 
10 GOTO 2000 

15 FOR REP=1 TO H 

20 REM USE DUMMY LIMES HERE - SEE TEXT 

21 REM 

998 NEXT REP 

1008 X=327:M1-31141 

16 16 Y^PEEK<26) +254*PEEK< 19) +254*256*P 
EEK(iS):Z=(Y-X)/50 

1029 M2=FRE(0) :M=M1-M2 

1030 ? J? !? "TIME TAKEN WAS H ;Z;" SEC 
S N :? TIME PER LOOP = ";2/R; ,h SECS" :? 
1640 ? "MEMORY USED IS ";M;" BYTES* 
1850 ? "PLEASE ALTER PROGRAM BY ENTER1 

NG ";:IF X=B THEN ? :? :? "1008 X= - ;Yj 
":Ml=";M2t? :? "AND ENTERING M ; 
1870 IF X>6 THEN ? " THE NEXT » ; 
10?0 ? "ROUTINE FOR TEST IN PLACE OF - 
■:LIST 20,93? 

1108 ? :? "PRESS ' BREAK ' TO STOP BUZZE 
R" 

1110 ? CHR$(253) j:F0R REP=1 TO 588tNEX 
T REPjGOTO 1110 

2009 REM SET UP MATRICES AND STRINGS H 
ERE 

3008 R=1008 

3018 ? CHR$U25) :? I? ,"TIMIM6 ROUTINE 
":? s? /by David Harry's? :? 'LOOP NO 
W RUNNING" 

3828 POKE 28,B:POKE 1?,8:P0KE 1S,8:G0T 
15 



The first RUN is a setting up run to isolate the 
effects of the program itself. Firstly enter a 
number of REM lines from line 20 onwards 
equivalent to the number of lines in the routine 
you are going to test as you are not testing the 
time taken to read line numbers, Next 
DIMension and initialise any strings or arrays 
from line 2000 on. Now RUN the program for 
the first time. 

When the program asks you to change Line 
1000, use the cursor up, enter the new line and 
enter your first routine for testing, starting from 
line 20. RUN the program and record the time 
and memory readings. Now change the routine 
to the one you want to compare and RUN 
again. Note the new readings . . , and so on. 



. . .Timing 



I originally wrote the routine to help with a 
program which used one long string to contain 
names and data for several individuals. Each 
name was allocated a 20 character section of 
string with blank characters (CHR$(32)} being 
used to extend names to the required length. 
This meant that where I wished the program to 
ask a question involving an individual's name, 
there was a variable length space before the 
next word in the question. One way round this 
would have been to use a FOR-NEXT loop to 
print the name one letter at a time, stopping at 
an end of name flag such as '*'. This seemed a 
little clumsy and slow. What I wanted was a 
character that would neither print anything on 
the screen nor move the cursor on. I found five: 
CHR$(1 58)— CLEAR TAB r CHR$[159>— SET TAB r 
CHR$(253}— SOUND BUZZER, CHR$(254)— 
DELETE CHARACTER, CHR${255)— INSERT 
SPACE. The buzzer was obviously out — too 
noisy! Inserting or deleting characters would 
involve moving a number of characters (ah 
blank) along the line which looked time 
consuming. However, it was still worth testing. 

I first of all entered line 2000 DIM NAME$<20) 
:NAME$="ERMINTRUDE ". This 






Issue 4 



1 



PAGE 6 



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has ten letters and ten spaces. Then at line 20 f 
NAME$;. Having RUN the program and entered 
rupJ? 00 , X=2728: M1-12370/t substituted 
<~HH$(157) for each blank and re-ran. When f 
had timed each of the four characters I ran the 
FOR-NEXT loop with an end of name flag and 
ERMINTRUDE" with no subsequent blanks for 
good measure. The initial run of 1000 
repetitions took 54.56 sees. The other times 
were 



CHnlp 

158 Clear Tab 

159 Set Tab 

254 Delete Char 

255 Insert Char 
FOR-NEXTIoop 
"ERMINTRUDE" 



TIME 
-14.00 sec 
-14.T8 sec 
137.58 sec 
140.80 sec 
101.00 sec 
-26.00 sec 



BYTES 







76 

-10 

saving in times, which came as a 
complete surprise to me, can only partly be 
explained by the extra lines and scrolling 
involved by printing the blanks. Ten CHR$(158} 

™*«£?J!; m seconds faster than ten 

^HHW32}. What surprising facts can you come 
up with? 



The 



17 



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ATARI 188 



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3f TG colours 

^f Picture save facility. 



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4 LETTER WORD 

A provocative title for a 

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Once you've started you can't stop. 

Use your powers of deduction to 

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there's over 800 of them! 



Required: 16K RAM r basic 

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Doodlebug only). 
All games are available on cassette onJy PRICE £6.50 
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SOFTWARE BARGAINS: 

We have a number of used Software items 
at well below R.R.P. These are original pro- 
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BOOKS, MAGAZINES 

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18 



PAGE 6 



Issue 4 



Grab an Apple 

Jamie Athas and Garry Francis, New South Wales, Australia 



This game is designed in ANTIC mode 4, a 
character mode which allows up to four colours 
to be displayed within the same character. Each 
character is set up in a 4 x 8 grid giving a total 
screen resolution of 160 across by 192 down. 
To use ANTIC mode 4 it is basically a matter of 
changing a Graphics display list, then 
redefining the character set. You are welcome 
to experiment with the techniques we have 
used. The game was originally in Graphics 5 
but ANTIC 4 increases its visual impact tenfold. 

HOW TO PLAY 

This is a game where you control a giant 
lengthening caterpillar, and have to eat the 
apple. The quicker you eat the apple, the more 
points you get, but if you take too long, it will 
disappear to a new location and you will lose 
five points. If you run over yourself or hit the 
wall,* you lose a life. You have three lives per 
game. Every time you eat an apple, the 
caterpillar is 'cut up' and your speed increases 
by 1 k/mh. 



PROGRAM NOTES 

The concept behind this game is a familiar 
one, but don't let that fool you. This game is 
totally original. 

When the program begins, a title page is 
scrolled up the screen. This is for visual impact 
only and serves no useful purpose, however 
anyone wishing to examine the code will find it 
quite interesting. Firstly let me assure you that 
it is NOT genuine scrolling, but display list 
manipulation. It works by writing your own 
display list {lines 1010 to 1030) consisting of a 
screenful of blank mode lines and a few 
GRAPHICS 2 lines which begin at the bottom of 
the screen. (This is cheating the system and I 
suggest that you avoid such things unless you 
know what you are doing.) The number of 
blank mode lines is gradually reduced using 
the simple FOR-NEXT loop in line 1060, so that 
the GRAPHICS 2 lines slowly creep up the 
screen. The teehinque is crude, but it works. 
You'll notice a certain degree of jerkiness, as 
the movements are not synchronised with the 
vertical blank. You can experiment with the 
speed by changing the delay (i.e. FOR W=1 TO 



15:NEXTW) in line 1060. 

When the scrolling is finished, the character 
set is copied from ROM to RAM (line 1070) 
using the machine language routine out of Stan 
Ockers Doggies, then seven of the special 
characters are redefined (line 1 100). I was going 
to draw up some pretty pictures to show how 
this is done in ANTIC mode 4 but unfortunately 
I ran out of time. 

The screen is then cleared and another 
custom display list is created (line 1160), this 
time for a screenful of ANTIC mode 4 with 3 
lines of Graphics at the bottom for scoring 
information. If you want an entire screen of 
ANTIC mode 4 in your own programs, then 
change the loop to read FOR l = DL+6 TO 
DL+28. This completes the initialisation. 

If you care to draw a flowchart of the main 

program {lines 20 to 370) you'll notice that it 

follows a very - efficient and logical flow, 

Beginners should take particular note of this. It 

is something that you should always strive for 

to achieve peak efficiency without losing 

readability. This is something I can never stress 

too much. Too many programs are written with 

a spaghetti-like structure! As a result, they run 

slow and use up about twice the memory 

necessary. In Grab an Apple, the effort has paid 

off. Speed is no longer a problem despite the 

delays for sounds. In fact, I had to insert a 

lengthy delay loop (line 240) to slow the game 

down. The game becomes more difficult as it 

progresses by reducing the length of this loop 

every time you eat an apple. You'll also notice a 

certain 'beat' to the program, which starts the 

adrenalin flowing as the pace increases. (This 

was the secret to Space Invaders success.) You 

have to eat 50 apples in one game to reach the 

fastest speed. I certainly can't do it! If you want 

to see the game at maximum speed, change 

the loop to read FOR 1=1 TO 1 ; NEXT I. 

Anyway, I hope you enjoy playing Grab an 
Apple as much as Jamie and I did writing it. * 

This article and program originally appeared 
in INSIDE INFO, the newsletter of Atari 
Computer Enthusiasts (N.S.W.h-Australia. 



Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



19 



i rem mmmmm***e**mx***ss 

2 REM S GRAB AN APPLE * 

3 REM * Jamie Athas & Garry Francis * 

4 REM * First published by H 

5 REM * Atari Computer Enthusiast* * 

6 REM X New South Wales - Australia S 

7 REM m**KS******K****S**m*K****K 

9 TRAP 2B80 

10 GQSUB 1800 

20 LIUES=3:SPEED=l:SCORE-0 

38 ? CHR*( 125) : COLOR 35:PL0T 38,8:DRAW 

TO 38,20 :DRAWTO 1,20:DRAWTO l,9;DRAWTO 

39,0 
4 B HX=4 : HY= 3 : DX= 1 : DY=8 : HEAD= 1 66 
50 POSITION 4,21:? "LIVES: ";LIUES:P0S 
ITION 27,21:? "COUNTDOWN" 

69 POSITION 4,22:? "SPEED: ";SPEED;" K 
m/h" 

70 POSITION 4,23:? "SCORE: 'jjCQLOR HE 
AD J PLOT HX,HY 

80 POSITION 11,23:? SCORE;* ";:COUNT=5 

8 

90 COLOR 32 i FOR 1=1 TO 2 

10B Z=lNT<36*RNDa>)+2:IF Z=*HX THEN 10 

8 

118 PLOT Z,2:0RAWT0 Z,1?:NEXT I :F0R 1= 

.1 TO 2 

120 Z=INT(18*RND<I>)+2;IF Z=HY THEN 12 



138 PLOT 2,Z:DRAWTQ 37,Z:NEXT I 

H0 AX=INT(36*RNDCl))+2tAY=INT< 13KRNOC 

DJ+2 

150 LOCATE AX,AY,Z:IF Z<>32 THEN 140 

160 COLOR 34sPL0T AX,AY:FQR 1=10 TO 

STEP -0,5; SOUND 8, 18B , IB , I :NEXT I :S0UN 

D 8,9,0*0 

170 POSITION 3lj22:? COUNT;" ":BX=HX:B 
Y=HY:ST~STICK<9> :IF ST=15 THEN 229 
1S8 POKE 77,0: IF ST=14 THEN DX=0:DY=-1 
:HEAD=164 

199 IF ST=13 THEN DX=9 ; DY= 1 : HEAD= 1 65 
299 IF ST=7 THEN DX= 1 :DY=0 :HEAD= 166 
219 IF ST=11 THEN DX=~1 :DY=0 ;HEAD=167 
229 HX=HX+DX:HY=HY+DY: LOCATE HX,HY,Z:S 
OUND 9,100, 12, 4: COLOR 161: PLOT BX,BY:C 
OLOR HEAD: PLOT HX,HY: SOUND 9,0,0,8 
238 IF Z0 32 THEN 260 

249 COUNT=C0UNT-l:IF COUNT THEN FOR 1= 
1 TO 51-SPEED;NEXT I : GOTO 176 

259 COLOR 32: PLOT AX, AY :SC0RE=SC0RE-5: 
GOTO 88 

260 IF Z034 THEN 380 

270 FOR 1=1 TO 59:S0UND 8,I,3,8:NEXT I 

tSOUND 9,0,9,0 

289 SCQRE=SCORE+ COUNT t SPEED=SPEED+ 1 : IF 

SPEED>59 THEN SPEED=58 
299 POSITION 11,22:? SPEED;" k/mh" :GOT 
80 

380 FOR 1=5 TO 255 STEP 19: SOUND 6,1,1 
8,3;NEXT I J SOUND 9,9,9,9 



319 LIUES=LIMES-i:IF LIUES THEN 39 

329 POSITION 8,21:? CHR*< 156) ;CHR*< 156 
) ;CHR*(156):IF SCGRE>HI THEN HI=SCORE 

330 POSITION 11,21:? "YOUR SCORE: " ;SC 
ORE;POS1TION 11,22:? "HIGH SCORE; U ;HI 
349 ? " DO YOU WANT ANOTHER GAME (Y 
/N)?"j 

359 GET #1,Z:IF Z=ASC("Y"> THEN 29 
369 IF ZOASCCN") THEN 359 
379 CLOSE til; POKE 32, 2: POKE 18 6, START + 
8: GRAPH I OS 0:END 

1988 START=PEEK(196)-3;P0KE JB6, START - 
1 

1010 GRAPHICS 4: POKE 559,0: POKE 788,70 
:P0KE 70?,108:POKE 718,14:POKE 711,54: 
DL=PEEK(569) +256*PEEK(561) 
1928 FOR I=DL+3 TO DL+26tP0KE I,112:NE 
XT I: POKE DL*27,71:P0KE DL+23,PEEK<88) 
:POKE DL+29,PEEKC89> 

1838 FOR l=DL+39 TO DL+33:PQKE I ,7:NEX 
T I: POKE DL+34,65;P0KE DL+35,PEEK<560) 
:POKE DL+36,PEEK<561) :POKE 37,2 
1940 POSITION 4,0:? #6; 'JAMIE ATHAS" iP 
OS1TION 1,1:? «6;"and gamy Francis" 
1949 REN NEXT LINE IN INUERSE 
1050 POSITION 6,2:? H6 ; "PRESENT" : PCS IT 
ION 3,4:? #6?"grab an apple" :POKE 559, 
34 

I960 FOR 1=96 TO 9 STEP -16:F0R J-DL+3 
TO DL+26:P0KE J.IiFQR W= 1 TO 15:NEXT 
W:NEXT J: NEXT I 

1979 DIM ML1K32>:F0R 1=1 TO 32:READ A: 
ML*<I)=CHR*(A) :NEXT I ;CHSET=256* START: 
X=USR(ADR<ML$) , 57344, CHSET) 
1038 DATA 104,104,133,284,104,133,283, 
194, 133,206,184,133,205,162,4 
1099 DATA 166,0,177,203,145,205,136,28 
3 , 24? , 239 , 294 , 230 , 296 , 292 ,298 , 249 , 96 
1199 FOR l=CHSET+3 TO CH3ET+63:READ As 
POKE I,A;NEXT I 

1119 DATA 69,255,252,63,255,255,255,69 
,18,8,29,85,85,85,85,29,239,239,239, 17 
9,254,254,254,170 

1129 DATA 60,68,198,190,255,255,255,25 
5,255,255,255,255, 190, 198,68,69 

1130 DATA 248,248,255,255,255,255,243, 
243 , 4 7 , 47 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 ,47,47 

1140 GRAPHICS 0:POKE 559,9; POKE 16,64: 
POKE 53774,64; POKE 82,0:POKE 83,39:P0K 
E 752,1 

1158 POKE 703, 54: POKE 709, 183; POKE 719 
,246: POKE 711,99:POKE 756, START 
1169 DL1160 DL=PEEK<568)+256*PEEK(561) 
SPOKE DL+3,63:FGR I=DL+6 TO DL+25;P0KE 
I,4:NEXT I 

1178 OPEN #1,4,8, "K:" :HI-B:POKE 559,34 
: RETURN 

2089 POKE 559, 34: GRAPHICS 9 
2010 ? "ERROR ";PEEK(1?5) ;" IN FOLLOWI 
NG LINE':LIST PEEK< 186) +256*PEEK< 187) < 



20 



PAGE 6 



Issue 4 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



STONE OF SISYPHUS 

ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 48K DISK 
1 PLAYER 

Stone of Sisyphus has been advertised for 
some time in the American magazines with 
gory colour pictures inviting you to 'come into 
our dungeon'. The Atari version promises full 
colour graphics on two action-packed disks. For 
once it's all true! Stone of Sisyphus is true 
Dungeons and Dragons for your Atari — well 
maybe not quite so complex, being based more 
on the simpler Tunnels and Trolls but 
nevertheless good value for all Adventurers. 

You start by creating your character, or rather 
having one created for you, but you can reject 
as many characters as you wish. Rather a pity 
this as you do not have to exercise any 
judgment, just keep ploughing through and 
sooner or later you will come up with a good 
one. Then you go on to the provisions store (no 
choice) and the armoury where you can 
purchase any of 30 different weapons and 26 
types of armour. When you have equipped 
yourself it's time to venture into the dungeon, 

I won't spoil the fun by telling you what you 
will find in the dungeon but I will say that the 
full colour graphics are all there and done very 
nicely — much better than the Scott Adams 
Graphic Adventure series. Colours are used 
well to depict the type of location you find 
yourself in, from dimly-lit passageways to 
brightly-lit rooms. There are puzztes to solve, 
treasures to find and collect and monsters to do 
battle with. Every scene is well-illustrated and 
for once the graphics do add a fot to the 
atmosphere. If you are a D & D afficionado, you 
might find a few things to complain about but 
remember that D & D is an immensely complex 
subject and to pack a dungeon onto a floppy 
disk and get good graphics is quite some feat. 

The disks save data as you progress and are 

updated each time you play. You can save 
characters for another journey and the disk 
records how many characters have ventured 
into the dungeon as well as the mortality rate. 
Stone of Sisyphus is one of three adventures in 



the Maces & Magic series by Chameleon 
Software but the others have not yet been 
converted to the Atari. I look forward to seeing 
them when they become available but in the 
meantime there are many hours of enjoyment 
to be had from Stone of Sisyphus. Thoroughly 
recommended. 

TRIAD 

ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 48K DISK 

1/2 PLAYERS 

Brilliant! A totally original arcade style game 
which combines the simplicity of noughts and 
crosses with nine different arcade games. A 
winner all the way. 

The overriding objective of the game is 
simple noughts and crosses — nothing more — 
but to get your cross in the box you have to 
play a complete arcade game chosen from one 
of the nine available. Get killed and a nought 
goes in the box instead. Three noughts and you 
lose. Three crosses and you go on to the next 
level. What makes Triad so good however are 
the superb graphics of each game and the fact 
that it is not just a shoot-em-up game, for you 
have to think about each game at each level to 
figure out just how you kill off the nasties. Let's 
take you through a game. You start with a 
noughts and crosses board with a 'nasty' in 
each of the squares. As you press the trigger 
these are scrambled to give you a random 
playboard and you choose where to put your 
cross by moving a large window cursor with 
the joystick. Press the trigger again and you are 
into the game you have chosen. As I said 
earlier, there are nine games and they are all 
different. Happy /sad faces, bug -eyed monsters, 
butterflies, chess pieces, spiders, arrows, 
hornets, flying saucers and bats are your 
adversaries. Each one requires a different 
technique. As you progress through the 
levels — by winning at noughts and crosses — 
the screen gets more and more crowded and 
the action faster. The graphics stay superb 
throughout. 

There are one or two player options and you 
can use joysticks, paddles or keys. The review 
copy was hot off the press and I did not get an 
instruction booklet so there may be even more 



■■ 



Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



21 



in there. I couldn't figure out how you get the 
two player option but the Adventure 
International catalogue says it's there, Triad 
should be available by the time you read this 
and if you have 48K and Disk get a look, it really 
is a unique game. If someone could pack Triad 
into 16K on cassette then I am sure it would be 
the number one seller for some time, but I fear 
it can't be done. Definitely one to make the 
upgrade and disk drive worthwhile though. 



THE SEARCH 

CS SOFTWARE 



16K CASS. 



1 PLAYER 32K DISK. 

You don't get many Graphic Adventures for 
16K machices, so The Search from CS Software 
was of considerable interest. First thoughts 
were that the 'graphic' part would consist of 
ordinary characters poked onto a Graphics 
screen with the rest left to imagination but that 
isn't what The Search is like. This becomes 
apparent as soon as the game is loaded. Colour 
is used quite extensively and to good effect to 
represent your surroundings and the various 
characters you will meet and objects you will 
find. There are no high-resolution graphics but 
then you can't expect that in 16K and without a 
disk drive. 

The game is a Fantasy Adventure where your 
quest is to find a magic ring and return it to the 
blue castle from whence you start. Included in 
the package is a letter from the High Wizard 
Moradoc — a nice touch this — giving you the 
benefit of his knowledge of what you might find 
on your travels. There are orbs for markers, 
mushrooms to eat for strengh, a magic carpet 
to whisk you to other locations, treasure chests 
and more specific items like keys, a chalice and 
the Great Sword. The Inhabitants of the land 
are an untrustworthy bunch and keep popping 
up at unexpected moments. You must decide 
whether to fight or bribe them or try and talk. 
Only your intuition will tell you the best course. 
There are over 100 screens for you to explore 
and various locations such as the West Woods, 
Middle Marsh and the Great Dark Forest. 
Overall the game is quite pleasing though 
seemingly difficult to succeed at. There are one 
or two things which are frustrating such as the 
slow speed your character moves and the fact 



that you have no control in the battles which 
seem to be decided somewhat arbitrarily. The 
game would certainly be improved if your 
character actually 'walked' about the screen as 
you moved him and if you could get more 
involved in the battles. 

There must be many owners with 16K 
machines who have not tried an Adventure for 
they are few and far between unless you have 
at least 32K. For these people The Search might 
be an ideal start although seasoned 
Adventurers would almost certainly find it too 
simplistic. The Search is available by Mail 
Order from CS Software at £14.95 including 
postage or from selected retailers. 

SHAFT RAIDER 



PROGRAM ONE INC. 
1 PLAYER 



32 K CASS. 
32K DISK 



What do you do when you want to write a 
game that is better than Airstrike, Protector and 
Caverns of Mars? Easy, you write one that 
combines the best of all three and add some 
improvements. That is basically what Shaft 
Raider is. 

You start with five ships in a horizontally 
scrolling landscape as in Airstrike but the first 
thing you notice is that the graphics of the 
cavern or the shaft are much better. In the early 
stages there are no missiles being launched but 
you have to bomb or shoot fuel and ammo 
dumps and stationary missiles whilst avoiding 
flak. The flak is quite dangerous, appearing at 
random, sometimes right on top of your ship 
giving you no chance to manoeuvre. As you 
enter and progress down the shaft there are 
space mines bobbing up and down which you 
cannot shoot, just avoid. When there are three 
or four in quick succession it is quite a feat of 
navigation to weave between them. Shortly 
after the space mines come force fields to 
navigate through followed by the Protector- 
type buildings with fuel tanks embedded in 
their roofs arid the first of the launching 
missiles. Some of them you can shoot but 
others you must avoid, there is no way of 
telling which. So it goes on. More and more 
hazards, narrower passages and more difficult 
force fields until you reach the Master Mine> 



22 



PAGE 6 



Issue4 



Once destroyed you reverse to dock with the 
mother ship above. After that, who knows? The 
instructions say you are warped back to the 
safety of deep space ready for your next Shaft 
assault Whether this means a different shaft or 
a repeat exercise I wouldn't know. You would 
need to be very very good to get that far. 

Although Shaft Raider takes elements from 
other well-known games it is nevertheless a 
very good arcade game. The action is certainly 
not spoilt by the familiarity. The sound by the 
way is great. Turn up your TV or better still 
hook into the hi-fi and you will be totally 
immersed in your role as Shaft Raider. 



UP, UP AND AWAY 

PULSAR 
1 PLAYER 



16K CASS 
16K DISK 



This is another of those deceptive games like 
Sea Dragon that you think are going to be easy 
but end up being just as frustrating as some of 
the games you knew from the beginning were 
going to be hard. What could be more serene 
than floating along in a hot-air balloon above 
the tranquil English countryside? Everything 
would be fine except for those nasty little kids 
throwing stones and flying kites and of course 
the vagaries of an English summer with a few 
storms and lightning once in a while. Then 
there is some idiot in a light aircraft thinking he 
is Waldo Pepper and trying to do aerobatics 
and I bet you didn't realise how dangerous bird 
droppings can be! The aim is to avoid all of 
these and land your balloon at various landing 
stages where you can take on extra fuel to 
continue your journey. It is not easy, 
particularly with those kids throwing stones 
fust as you lift off. 

Graphically this is superb, using redefined 
characters to excellent effect to create the 
green English countryside with trees and 
churches, pubs, factories and windmills. There 
are some nice touches such as being able to 
watch your deflated balloon through the foliage 
of the trees as it sinks behind them and seeing 
the kids get annoyed as you get past them! 
There is plenty of music as well as you pass the 
windmills and pubs. 



The practice level is fairly hard but if you get 
good at it there are five levels in all. Only a one 
player game but you are sure to get family and 
friends around watching if only for the beautiful 
graphics. Perhaps not as complex as many of 
the American games but the colour and design 
more than makes up r and this game shows that 
there are in Britain at last programmers capable 
of producing the goods for the Atari. Up, Up & 
Away was originally priced at £21.95 but, as a 
home-grown product, has now been reduced to 
£14.95. At this price it represents good value for 
money. 



MORE REVIEWS 



The following programs have been received 
for review but time and space prevents further 
comments. Full reviews of some of these 
programs will appear in later issues. 

MAGIC WINDOW by Quicksilva. A superb 
cassette- based character redefinition utility 
retailing at about £3.00. One of the best 
bargains you are likely to find, 

THE CONSTRUCTOR by Channel 8 Software. A 
comprehensive Player-Missile editor allowing 
you to create up to 250 images and overlay or 
animate them and save for inclusion in your 
own program. Requires 48K. 

MONKEYMATH from Artworx. Great maths 
education game for younger children with little 
monkeys trundling out the problems and a big 
chimp solving them! A combination of easy 
arcade action and education, A really nice 
program. Requires 16K, 

FOUR LETTER WORD by Soflow Software. A 
sort of word mastermind requiring you to 
guess four letter words. 800 word vocabulary, 
Despite its title all naughty words are carefully 
screened out! 16K cassette. 

DOODLEBUG by Soflow Software, A mini 
Micro-Painter allowing you to draw pictures 
with the joystick in 16 colours and save or 
retrieve to disk or cassette, Not as sophisticated 
as Paint or Micro-Painter but you don't need 
48K and a disk drive. Comes on 16K cassette. 



23 



ALL THE FUN 
OF THE AIR 



How do you fancy getting away from 

it all with a trip in our hot air balloon? j))~^ 

Sounds tempting doesn't it But it takes Iv, 
skill and fast reactions to avoid 
all the hazards. 

Are you up to it? 

Could you manoeuvre the hallnon 
over the tree tops and mountain 
peaks, while still keeping an eye on 
your ballast and your fuel because 
when it starts In run low you'll have 
to descend and not heing distracted 
by people throwing stones at you 
land carefully on the fuel pods. 
You'll be lucky to rise back up 
again. But look out!! 

Watch that kite doesn't become 
entangled with you and don't 
worry about that noise its only 
the aeroplanes that come 
diving and swooping at you. 
Youll need to rise higher to 
avoid the turbulance from " 
the windmill blades but 
as you do you're likely 
to run into storm clouds and 
bolts of lightening. Also the 
higher you climb in the 
stratosphere the more difficult the 
balloon becomes to handle. 

By now you'll start to panic!! and 
wonder how on earth you're going to Jf 
make it, but then again that's all the 
fun of the air. 



p- — — — — — — — — — — — - 

■ ]"i)st Coupon n>nw 1n 
I Starcade, IS Moorfields, Liverpool L2 JBQ. 

■ Mease rush me copies a\ up, up and iwiy 

_ fiLiitnhle for AlBri 4CKV800 l&K tassetle or 32K diaL. 
I Please debit my Access 'Bardaycarnl 

■ |T>fiJeieas fwf*s*ary| 

" ' MINI 



Cad 

I tJiimbH' 

■ J enclose chequevP.O- inr L 

.Name 

I Address 



rn 



o 



SUPEHfiASTCHEaTCARD SALES LINE 

0^2366628 24hrsi 




£14-95 



Starcade, 15 Moorflelds, Liverpool L2 2BQ 



24 



PAGE 6 



Issue4 



Disk Sort 

Peter Franey, West Midlands 



This program is a little too long to be used as 
a tutorial, however it is a useful way to illustrate 
the ways in which the disk directory can be 
used and tailored for your own needs. The 
program can be used in its own right but by 
studying the listing you may be able to learn 
how to use your disk drive to greater 
advantage. The main menu will also give you a 
brief insight into modifying display lists. 

PROGRAM OPTIONS 

1. DISK DIRECTORY— This option allows 
you to sort the directory in alphabetical order, 
either by main file name or extension. The 
advantages of sorting by EXTension name are 
that you can group together programs of 
similar function provided of course you use an 
extension representative of the program type. 
Both the option of main file name and 
extension are given in the sort routines. By 
altering the lines indicated in the REM 
statements or even deleting them completely, 
you may control the types of file read from the 
directory. Bear in mind that if this is done not 
all of the files will be displayed or included in 
the file count. 

2. RUN PROGRAM— This option allows the 
user to select and run a program from the disk r 
by single stepping through the directory. If the 
stepping continues to the end of the directory, 
the program will return to the main menu. The 
instructions for this option are displayed on the 
screen. 

The line by line description of the program is 
as follows: 



10 

30-100 

110-160 
190-250 

590-660 



dimension variables and goto 
menu 

open and get directory — 
append to work string 

sort menu 

sort main file names 



sort by extension 



700-740 de po sit f i I e d ata i n ut i I ity stri n g 

in ranked order 

745-790 print results 

1100-1370 modify display list 

1 500-1 600 d isplay di rectory for optio n 2 



1610 



exclude 'list' files 



1620-1660 compile correct file name format 
for RUN 

Without the REM statements the program 
will take up 44 sectors on a disk. 

The main disadvantage of the program is that 
the alphabetical sort will take several seconds. 
The more files that are on your disk, the longer 
it will take. The main reason for the longish 
time for this sort is that after sorting, the 
directory is deposited, in the correct order, in a 
utility string which is then used in a rolling 
display. This part of the program can be 
improved. 

i rem *3smma*xm3mxoHm**t 

2 REM I DISK SORT * 

3REM i BY * 

A REM J PETER FRANEY * 

s rem mmimimmummmii 

18 DM A*< 17*43) ,Bt (17) >Z* U > ,C$< 17*£) 
> f RANK(43> f Ft<28);F0fl [=1 TO 43iftANK<I 
)=B:NEXT IiF=8:G0TQ 1188 
38 TRAP i47*:Af=":A*=CfiF=esOPEN HI, 4 
,8yB!*.K':REn SET COUKT TO 8 WD OPEN 
DIR 

48 INPUT Hl,Bt!flE« RETRIED FILES 
Si IF B*(1U3)='SYS" OR Wdl.W^'R 
E' OR 8$(U,13)= i DAT' THEN 4*:REM EXCL 
UD£ HON LOAD FILES 
55 REM ADJUST LINE 58 TO YOUR OW 
REQUIREMENTS 

68 IF BUS ,10 s 'FREE SECTORS' THEN 188 
;REH CHECK FOR DIRECTORY END 
78 A*aEMA*)H)=»!F=F+l:REN APPEND F 
ILE NttE TO WORK STRING AND INCREASE F 
ILE COUNT 
88 GOTO 48 

196 CLOSE lit IF FLAG=I THEN RETURN : BE 
H CLOSE DIRECTORY-RETURN IF OPTION 2 S 
ELECTED 



Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



25 



111 GRAPHICS 8:PQKE 71t,lMsP0KE 789,1 

&3P0KE 712,292:POKE 752, J 

128 ? "tWYOU HAY SORT THE DIRECTORY ft 

S FOLLOWS' 

138 ? "U 1 ALPHABETICAL ORDER FO 

R HAIN EIGHT CHARACTER NAME' 

148 ? :? S? ' 2 ALPHABETICAL ORDE 

fi FOR EXTENSION' 

158 ?:?:?' THERE ARE ';F;' FILE 

S ON THIS DISK" 

152 ? ;? ' tffi) ';» 

168 ? "4t ENTER OPTION' ;: HEM WOR 

DS IN 1NUERSE 

178 CLOSE «1:OP£N 01 ,4^,'Kt'iGET *1,X 

rCLOSE ll:Z*=CHR*OQ:REN GET SINGLE KE 

Y STROKE 

172 IF Z$**i* OR 7**' 2" THEN 174 

173 SOTO 178 

174 ? CHR*U25>iP0SITim 8,12;? 'SORTI 
NG IN PROGRESS' iREM INVERSE 

188 X=WL<Z*hQN X OOSUB 288 ,688; RET LfR 
N 

198 REM RANK FILENAMES IN ALHA. ORDER 
298 FOR [=1 TO F:RANK=F 
218 FOR R=l TO F 

228 IF A*U7*I-14,17JJ-7)<A*(17JR-14,] 
7*R-7! THEN RANK=RANK-1 
222 REM IF MAINNAHE SAME THEN COMPARE 
EXT 

225 IF A*(l7KI-14,i?*l-7>-A*<]7*R-]4 f l 
7*R-7) THEN IF AtU7*I-6,l7JI-4XA$U7 
JR-4,l?KR-4> THEN RAW=RANK-1 
238 NEXT R 
248 RAW(D=RANK 
258 NEXT IiGOTC 788 

598 REM RAW EXTENSIONS IN ALPHABETIC* 
L ORDER 

688 FOR I=! TO F:RANK=F 
618 FOR JM TO F 

628 IF A*(l?*l-4,17*[-4XA*U7IR-6,173 
R-4) THEN RANK=RANK-i 
425 REM IF EXT SAME THEN CHECK ALPHABE 
TICAL ORDER OF MAIN NAME 
638 IF A*a7*l-4,17*l-4)=A*n7SR-6,l7* 
R-4) THEN IF ftt< 17*1-14, 17* I-7)<A*( 17* 
R-J4,J7*R-7) THEN RANK=RAM<-1 
648 NEXT R 
658 RWK(J)=ftANK 
668 NEXT I 

498 REM DEPOSIT l«CS INTO UTILITY STR 
ING IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER 
788 FOR 1=1 TO F 
718 FOR R=l TO F 

728 IF [=RANK<R> THEN W 17*1-14, 17*1) 
=A*(17*R-I6,17*R> 
738 NEXT R 
748 NEXT [I? ■>* 
745 POSITION 8,8 
752 IF X=l THEN ? ' SORTING B 

Y MAIN FILENAME 'iREM INVERSE 
754 IF X=2 THEN ? ■ SORTING 

BY EXTENSION "iREM INVERSE 



755 GOSUB 754:GOT0 748 

754 ? , 'FILENAME YEXTySIZE'tflETURN 

:REM INVERSE 

768 OftfFOR 1=1 TO FiC-C+J 

778 ? 1 C*CI7KI-i4,173EI-7) > C»(17KI-A > 17 

u-4y } mmi-2 v mi}\m print main n 

AHE,EXT AND SIZE 

788 IF C=13 THEN GOSUB 1888 :REM IF SCR 
EEN FULL THEN HALT DISPLAY 
79% NEXT I :? '4 DIRECTORY END' 

;REH WORDS IN INVERSE 
888 ? ' PRESS START TO READ DIRECTO 
RY'iREN START IN IWERSE 
818 ? * PRESS SELECT TO RE-DISPLAY' 
iREM SELECT IN INVERSE 
328 ? ' PRESS OPTION TO RE-SORT' :R£ 
M OPTICN IN MOSE 

838 ? • PRESS RETURN TO EXIT' :REM fi 
ETURN IN INVERSE 
848 POKE 764,255 

858 IF PEEK* 764)= 12 THEN RETURN :REM [ 
RETURN) KEY 

868 IF PEEK<53279)=4 THEN 38:REM [STAR 
Tl KEY 

378 IF PEEK(5327?)=3 THEN 118tREM tOPT 
I ONI KEY 

838 IF PEEKC53279>=5 THEN ? CHWU25): 
GOTO 745:REM ISELECT1 KEY 
698 GOTO 358 

1888 ? :? * PRESS SELECT TO RE-SORT 
■:REM SELECT IN INVERSE 
1818 ? " PRESS START TO RE-READ DIR - 
ECTORY':REM START IN INVERSE 
1828 ? * PRESS OPTION TO LIST MORE 
FILES' iREM OPTION IN INVERSE 
1822 POSITION 8,9l? 'FILES:' ;F 
1824 POSITION 8,11:? "TO LISTj'jF-1 
1838 IF PEEK* 5327?) =4 THEN RUN 
!848 IF PEEK<5327?)-3 THEN ? TlMlG 
OSUB 754:RETURN 
1858 IF PE£K(53279)=5 THEN 118 
1868 GOTO 1838 

1188 GRAPHICS 8: POKE 55? ,8 :DL=PEEK( 568 
)+PEEK(561>*254+4 
>:ie POKE 0L-1,71:REH POKE LMS 
1128 POKE DL+2,7jREH 2 LINES GR,2 
1138 FOR 1=3 TO 16;P0KE DLH,4:NEXT I: 
REM 14 LINES OF GR.I 
]]48 POKE DL+17,7:POKE DL+18,7:REM 2 L 
MS Gfl.2 

1158 POKE 0L+ 19 ,2:P0KE DL*28,2:REM 2 L 
INES GR.8 

1168 POKE DL+23,45:POKE DL+?2 f PEEK(568 
):PQKE DL+23,PEEK(541):REH POKE END OF 
LIST, LOU & HIGH RETURN ADDRESS 
1178 POKE 87,2:P0HE 38,64:P0KE 89,156: 
REM POKE MODE, TOP k BOTTOM OF SCRN MEM 
ORY 

1188 POSITION 8,*:? U\' disk sort" 
1199 POKE 87,1:P0KE 8a,184:PQKE 89,154 
:REM POKE MODE, TOP h BOHOM OF SCREEN 
HEHORY 



1288 POSITION 8,8:? 14;' MENU OPTION 

S 1 

1228 POSITION 8,3s? U\' I...M dir 

ectory'iPOSlTION 8,5s? **;" 2... run p 

rograT 

1238 POSITION 8,7:? 14} ' 3,. .exit' 

1235 POKE 87,2iP0KE 88,128:P0KE 89,157 

1237 POSITION 8,8:? 14}' ENTER OPT 10 

r 

1246 POKE 87,8iPOKE 88,148:P0KE 89,157 
1258 POSITION 8,Bj? ' BY PETER 

FRJHET 

1248 POSITIONS,!:? ■ MARCH 

1983' 

1378 SnCOLOfi 2,4,2:SETCOL0R 4,4,2:POK 
E 559,34:REM SETCOLOURS-TURN ON DISPLA 
Y 

1338 CLOSE NIsOPEN Kl^.e.'K:" ;GET HI, 
XsCLOSE 81:Z*=CHR*(X):1F Z*='3' THEN P 
OKE 82,2:P0KE 83, 3?: GRAPHICS 8:END 
1398 IF Z*='l' OR Z*='2* THEN 1418 
1488 GOTO 1339 

1418 X=VAL(Zt):ON X GOSUB 38,1588:0010 
1188 

1588 FLA6=l:G0SUe 38 
1518 GRAPHICS 2+16:FLAfe8 
1528 ? U;' disk directory" 
1538 POSITION 8,9:? M;'option-step a :P 
OSITION 8,18:7 fWj'START-RUN DISPLAY'; 
REM option-step IN INVERSE 
1548 POSITION 8,8:? U ; 'SELECT-EXIT' :R 
EM INVERSE 
1558 FOR 1=1 TO F 

1552 FOR H=1 TO 38:NEXT M:POKE 53279,7 
1555 POSITION 8,2:? 14 ;A*< 17*1-14,17*1 
-7) ,«( 17*1-4, 17*1-4) 
1568 IF P£EK(53279>=5 THEN RETURN 
1578 IF PEEK* 53279) =3 THEN 1688 
1588 If PEEK(5327?>=6 THEN GOSUB 1618 
1598 GOTO 1548 
1488 NEXT I: RETURN 

1418 IF A*< 17*1-4, 17*1-4>='LSV THEN R 
ETURN :REH LIST FILE SELECTED-HILL NOT 
LOAD 

1415 REM LINE 1618 SET TO YOUR OWN 
REQUIREMENTS 

1428 Ft= i D:':f*(LEN(F*)+l)=A*< 17*1-14, 
17*1-7) 

1638 L»L£N(F*):IF L>! AND F*(L t D= p ' 
THEN F*=FKItL-l):GOTO 1438jREM REMOVE 
UNWANTED BLANKS 

1435 REM IF EXT THEN AOO DOT AND EXT 
1448 IF AtC]7*I-4 1 17*[-4>0 , ' THEN 
F*CLEN(F*) + 1)=' .' :F*(LEN(F*) H)=A*< 17* 
I-4,17*1-4J 
1458 POSITION 8,2:? 86;' loading 

' :POSETI0K ft,3:? #4j' ';Fi 
1468 TRAP 1678 :RUN F* 
1478 GRAPHICS 2*16:POSmON 8 ( 4f? «i' 
cannot load'iFOR W=l TO 288:NEXT H:R 
UN m 



26 



PAGE 6 



Issue 4 



Character 
igner 

Paul Stevens 

Unfortunately there were a 
few printing problems with 
the listings in Issue 3 and 
Paul Stevens' Character 
Designer suffered most. It is 
repeated here in full with 
apologies to Paul. 

l rem mmmmmimm 

2 REM i CHARACTER DESIGNER J 

3 REM K BY PAUL STEVENS J 

4 REM I 4/3/83 * 

5 rem mmrnxmrnxe*** 

4REH 

IB GRAPHICS 23iP0KE 559,1 iPCKE 783,184 

:P0KE 78?,252:P0KE 71B,8:P0KE 711,138: 

POKE 752,1 

28 REM ALTER DISPLAY LIST 

38 A=PE£K(548MP£EK(54i)*254+4 

48 POKE A-1,78:P0KE A+2,4iF0KE A*5,2:P 

OKE A*95,2:P0KE A+??,2;P0KE 5*8,154 

58 POKE 87,1:PCS1TI0N 1,8:? 86; "char ac 

ter detigner'iREM INVERSE VIDEO 

68 POKE 87,8 POSITION 2,3:? 'DATA 8,8, 

78 REM POKE WRITING TO SCREEN BOTTOM 

88 A=PEEK(88)tPEEK«B?) 3(256+ 3728 

98 FOR C=l TQ 47:READ D,E:P0KE A+D,E:N 

EXT C 

188 DATA 5,48,4,58,7,37,8,51,9,51,11,1 



79,12, 188,13,141, 14,178, 15, 188, 17,52,1 

8,47,28,35,21,33,22,44,23,35,24,53 

118 DATA 25,44,24,33, 27,52, 28,37, 38,34 

,31,33,32,52,33,33,85,48,84,58,87,37,8 

8,51,89,51,91,175,92,174,93,188 

128 DATA 94,149,95,175,94,174,98,52,99 

,47, 181,35, 182,44, 183,37, 184,33, 185,58 

,187 ,39, 188 ,58, 189,4], JIB ,34 

138 POKE 87 f ?:CX0R 1 

148 REM DRAW 8x6 GRID 

158 FOR A=? TO 89 STEP 38 

148 PLOT 48,A:DRAMT0 12B,A:NEXT A 

178 FOR A=48 TO 128 STEP 18 

1B8 PLOT A,9!DRAWT0 A,89jl£XT A 

198 POKE 559,34 

286 REM HOVE MARKER ON GRID 

218 X-45iY=14 

228 S=ST1CK(8) 

238 IF PE£K<5327?)=4 THEN 498 

248 IF PEEK<53279>=3 THEN 448 

258 IF S=14 THEN GOSUB 37B:Y=Y-18 

248 IF ^13 THEN GOSUB 378:Y=YM8 

278 IF S=ll THEN GOSUB 379;X=X-I8 

288 IF S^7 THEN GOSUB 378;X=XM8 

298 IFX(45THENX=115 

388 IF X>115 THEN X=45 

318 IF Y< 14 THEN Y=fl4 

328 IF Y>34 THEN Y=J4 

338 COLOR 8: PLOT X,Y 

348 FOR DOAY=1 TO 58:NEXT DELAY 

358 IF STRIG(8)=8 THEN 418 

348 COLOR 2:PL07 X,YrG0T0 228 

379 POKE 53279,8:LOCATE X+1,Y,C 

388 IF C=8 Tt£N COLOR 8:PLQ7 X,Y 

398 RETURN 

488 REM FILL SQUARE 

418 LOCATE X+1,Y,C 



428 IF C=8 THEN COLOR 2:D=!88 

438 IF C=2 THEN COLOR 8:0=288 

448 SOUND 8, D, 18,8 

458 FOR B*=Y-4 TO V*4 

448 PLOT X-4,B:DRANT0 X*4,B:NEXT B 

478 SOUND 8,8,8 ,8:GOT0 228 

438 REM SCAN GRID 1 CALCULATE DATA 

498 COLOR 8:PL0T X,Y:PLOT B,18:P0KE 87 

,8:P0SJTICN 7,3:? ■ 

588 POKE 87,7:f>4 

518 FOR 3=14 TO 34 STEP 18 

528 E=256:IM 

538 FOR A=45 TO 115 STEP 18 

548 E=E-E/2 

558 LOCATE A+1,B,C 

548 IF C=2 THEN K=H+E 

578tCXT A 

588 REM PRINT DATA 

598 PLOT 8,18:POKE 87, 8 .-POSITION D,3: 9 

V|H 

488 IF 0=4 THEN POSITION D,3i? M ' 

418 IF H>=188 THEN D=D+4 

428 IF HCJ88 THEN IF H>? THEN D=D+3 

438 IF H< 18 THEN 0=0+2 

44B POKE 87,7;NEXT BiGOTO 228 

458 REM CLEAR GRID 

468 COLOR 8 

478 FOR B=14 TO 94 STEP 18 

488 FOR A=45 TO 125 STEP 18 

498 LOCATE A,B,C:IF C<>2 THEN 728 

788 FOR D=B-4 TO B+4:PLUT A-4,0 

718 DRAWTO AM,D:NEXT D 

728 NEXT AjNEXT BjPLOT 8,18 

738 POKE 87,8:POSITI0N 7,3s? '8,8,8,8, 

8,8,8,8 'tPOKE87,7 

748 GOTO 218 • 



Public Domain Programs 



A number of offers have been received from 
User Groups in America and Australia to 
exchange disks of Public Domain programs 
which is a great idea but does cause a problem 
in that there seems to be very few programs 
available in the U.K. to make up disks for 
exchange. If you read Antic magazine you will 
know that you can purchase disks of Public 
Domain programs from them at low cost and 
Page 6 would like to do the same making both 
disks and cassettes of U.K. and overseas 
material available to Users. The success of this 
depends entirely on you. If there are not 
enough programs to make up a U.K. disk then 
we will have nothing to exchange, so if you 
have written a program or a demonstration, 
send a cassette or disk to Page 6, When your 
program is included on a U.K. disk, your disk or 
tape will be returned {when the exchange 



programs are available) with something like 
5-10 programs from overseas. Other Users will 
be able to purchase disks or tapes at the cost of 
making them available. 

Sounds good, doesn't it? Well it's up to you 
to make it work, so send in your programs now. 

NEXT ISSUE 

As well as more programs, articles, hints and 
tips we hope to be able to publish a definitive 
Fist of all the books that are available for your 
Atari computer. This is where YOUR help will 
be invaluable. If you have any unusual books 
on the Atari, perhaps that you obtained from 
America, please drop us a line with details of 
the title, publisher and price and a brief 
description of the contents. Let's see how many 
books there really are for the Atari. 



Issue 4 



PAGE 6 



27 



G. & Software 

SI, Redhouse Lane, Bradbury, Stockport, Cheshire, Telephone: 061-494 9183 

Send cheque or P,O t payable to C.S.Software*Please state tape or disk 



The Search £14-95 




incl . VAT 
<£ P&P, 

Avai labl e 

on 
16k, Tape 

or 
32k, Disk 



: 2Pggs& 



Full colour real time graphic 
adventure game r Travel through 
a magical and dangerous land 
making friends or doing battle 
in your quest for the ring* 



Qnmputar anrnmard £14-95 




incl, VAT 
& P&P. 

Available 

on 
iSk.Tape 

or 
32k t Disk 



Defend the planet Valox from the 
invadin g Zorkonian hordes in 
this niuJti -screen all action 
game of strategy . Full colour 
and great sound effects , 



Dealer enquiries welcomed 



Merlin's Magic Square continued 

5929 IF SO<5>=8 THEN GOSUB 358 

5838 IF Sfl(5)=l THEN GOSUB 389 

■ 5348 IF SQC5)=8 THEN SQ(5)=l:G0TQ 5948 

5858 IF S0(5)-i THEN 3Q<5)=9 



3988 SOUND 8,128,13,9 

3818 A=2i:8=7:OS:D=?:Z=3 

3828 IF SQ<3>=8 THEN GOSUB 359 

3838 IF S0(3)=l THEN GGSUB 396 

3940 IF SQ(3)=9 THEN SQ(3) = hG0T0 36^8 

3956 IF S0(3)=l THEN SOOJ-6 

3868 SOUND 8,128,18,8 

3979 RETURN 

3997 REM Wi KEY NUMBER 4 PRESSED 

3??B GOSUB 1999 

3999 GGSUB 7888 

^eee sound «» 121,18, a 

4916 ft=15:B=18:C=niO=]2!Z=4 

4828 JF Sfl(4>=6 THEN GOSUB 358 

4934 IF SQ<4)=1 THEN GGSUB 398 

4948 IF StK4>=9 THEN SQC4) = 1:G0T0 4848 

4858 IF SQ(4)=1 THEN SQ(4)=8 

4869 SOUND 8,121,10,8 

4978 RETURN 

4995 REN m KEY NUMBER 5 PRESSED 

4996 GOSUB 2888 
4??7 GOSUB 4688 
4998 GOSUB 6800 
499? GOSUB 8998 

5998 SOUND 8,183,10,8 

5818 A=18:B=18:C=n:D=l2:Z=5 



5068 SOUND 0,198,18,8 
5878 RETURN 

5997 REM MX KEY NUMBER 6 PRESSED 

5998 GOSUB 3898 

5999 GOSUB 9888 
im SOUND 0,96,18,8 

6016 fr=21i8=ie*C=n:D=l2:Z=6 
6928 If S0(4)=8 THEN GOSUB 359 
6830 IF SQ(6)=1 THEN GOSUB 389 

6848 IF SG<6)=8 THEN SQC4)=1:G0TG 6668 
6850 IF SG<6) = 1 THEN SQ<6>=6 

6849 SOU* 8,96,18,8 
6878 RETURN 

6996 REM HI KEY NUMBER 7 PRESSED 

6997 GOSUB 4808 

6998 GOSUB 5880 
499? G0SU8 9889 
7899 SOUND 8,91,18,3 

7918 A=i5rB=13:C=14:B=15:Z=7 
7828 [F SQ(7)=8 THEN GOSUB 356 
7838 IF S0(7»=l THEN GOSUB 388 
7848 IF SQ<7)=8 THEN S0£7)=l:GOT0 7868 



7859 IF S0t7>=l THEN SQ(7)=fl 

?m SOU* 8,91,18,8 

7879 RETOW 

7??7 REM II3( KEY NUMBER 8 PRESSED 

7998 GOSUB 7880 

79?? GOSUB 9888 

9088 SOUND 8,81,19,8 

8619 A=18:B=13:C=!4;D=15:Z=8 

8829 IF SQ(8)=0 THEN GOSUB 358 

8939 IF SG(8)=1 THEN GOSUB 390 

3848 IF SQ<8)=6 THEN SQ<8>=!:G0T0 8068 

8858 IF S0(8)=l THEN SO(8)=0 

8869 SOUND 8,81,10,8 

8978 RETURN 

8994 REM m KEY NUMBER 9 PRESSED 

899? GOSUB 5888 

8998 GOSUB 4886 

8999 GOSUB 3988 
9686 SOUND 8,72,19,8 

9018 fr2hB=13:C=14:Del5:Z=9 

9926 IF SQ(?)=« THEN GOSUB 359 

9838 IF S0(9)=l THEN GOSUB 388 

9648 IF SQ<9)=9 THEN S9X?)=hGOT0 9848 

9658 IF SQ(9)=1 THEN SO<9)=6 

9948 SOUND 9,72,16,8 

9978 RETURN • 



IF YOU WRITE TO OR PHONE ADVERTISERS PLEASE MENTION PAGE 6 



28 



PAGE 6 



Issue4 



First Steps 

John Dimmer, Elgin, Scotland 



FIRST STEPS takes a different format this 
month in that it features an article and program 
submitted by JOHN DIMMER as a Beginners 
Page, i am sure that John witi be the first to 
admit that there are many improvements that 
could be made to the program and that is 
where you come in. See what you can learn 
from the program. I will pass on all your 
suggestions. 

The only alteration which has been made to 
the original is to replace the original lines 10-50 
with an amended line 1 and the subroutine at 
line 500. As originally written, the program 
would only run with 46K memory. 

I purchased an Atari 800 at Xmas and I soon 
discovered that I needed to know a vast amount 
of information and Atari are not very helpful. I 
took Mike Reynolds-Jones' advice and bought 
'Your Atari 400/800 Computer'. I found it to be 
excellent for the beginner. I also subscribed to 
The UK Atari Owners Club' run by Maplin, and 
between PAGE 6 and others I am slowly 
beginning to unravel the mysteries of 
computing and the Atari — well, they are 
mysteries to me! I also bought the Master 
Memory Map which is invaluable In trying to 
understand magazine listings. 

I humbly offer my first 'long' program which 
is designed to work out my bank balance and 
also act as a monthly reminder. It includes a 
character set redefinition routine which I have 
pinched from 'The UK Atari' — issue 1 (due 
acknowledgments). The program will have to 
be adapted to your own personal requirements. 
Please send any suggestions for improvements 
to the Editor. 



Line 1 


clears screen and lowers 




Memtop for new character set 


Lines 3-9 


sets up initial display 


Line 10 


goes to subroutine at 500 to 




move character set and 




redefine ! as £ 


Line 55 


removes ci/rsor 


Lines 61-75 


sets the variables and monthly 




variations 


Line 66 


leave P=0:W(0)=0 



Line 75 

Lines 81-93 

Lines 95-110 
Lines 125-170 

Lines 180-280 



Lines 300-330 
Lines 345-347 



opens the channel for the 
Yes/No interlude 
sets up the second display — 
adjust for your own use 
the GET Yes/No routine 
does the calculations and sets 
up the cheque display 
using string variables, the 
monthly reminders are 
displayed, I used this area to 
remind me of birthdays, 
anniversaries, bills etc, 
optional information to suit 
your requirements 
allows you to repeat 



8 REM USE INVERSE FOR TITLES ETC. 
1 ? CHRIU25) sPOKE 184, PEEK (196) -5 

3 GRAPHICS *:P0KE 718,243 

4 POSITION 13,2;? i m MONTHLY m* 

5 POSITION 12,5:? m m FINANCIAL III' 

6 POSITION 15,8s? 18 *D KH 1 

7 POSITION 13, J|:^ ■JSI SOCIAL UV 

8 POSITION 13,14:7 , «fl SUtlARY m* 

9 POSITION 2,28:? 'NATT A MO, LOADING 
THE WIN PR06FW1':? 

J» G0SU8 5«8 

55 POKE 752,1;P0KE 756,CHSET 

61 DIM C*(]2>,NC58> 

62 PRINT 'ENTER THE MOKTH - ';:1NPUT C 
t 

&6 ^18a.2:B=lfl:C=28:D=2e:E=]5:F=12:6s= 

44:H=9:P=8:W(0)=B 

6? IF tt=' JANUARY' THEN rt=3,5 

72 IF C^'MARCH' THEN C=B 

73 IF tt^APRJL' THEN C=9 

74 IF Ct*' DECEMBER' THEN B=5 

75 OPEN «,4,8,*K:' 
81 ? CHR*< 125) 

81 7 :7 'mum- MQNTH.Y CO+IITNENTS 

33 ? 3? 'A = MORTGAGE REPAYMENTS »■ 
'A 

84 ? 'B = ENMWENT INSURANCE 

85 ? "C = LOCAL HATES 
to ? 'D = m& PERSCNAL LOAN 

87 7 ■£ = UIDEO HIRE 

88 ? "F = TU HIRE 

89 7 "G = HIRE PURCHASE LOAN 
99 7 'H ■ MISCELLANEOUS 



i ■ 



I*! 



B 
C 
D 
£ 
F 
G 
|H 



I ssue 4 



PAGE 6 



29 



THE PAGE 6 AWARDS 



YOUR PROGRAM, ARTICLE OR 

REVIEW COULD BE WORTH £50 IN 

SOFTWARE ! 



In the last issue we announced a readers' poll 
to be conducted at the end of our first year to 
find the best programs, articles and reviews 
from the first six issues. Since then we have 
been talking to a few retailers and distributors 
and hope to be able to offer more prizes by way 
of sponsorship — details will be announced in 
Issue 6. In the meantime, if you want to have 
the chance of winning and would like to get 
your name in print, send us a program, article 
or an in-depth review. Don't be shy, your work 
is probably better than you think! 



SEND YOUR CONTRIBUTION NOW 




m DUST 

• COVERS 



PROTECT VOUR VALUABLE ATARI EQUIPMENT 
WITH A CUSTOM-MADE DUST COVER WHICH 
(unlike most things for your Atari!) IS AVAIL- 
ABLE FROM PAGE 6 AT A VERY MODEST COST. 
ESPECIALLY VALUABLE IF YOU HAVE A FULL 
KEYBOARD BUT EQUALLY AS GOOD FOR THE 
STANDARD 400 AND ALL PERIPHERALS. HAND- 
SOMELY DESIGNED IN NATURAL PVC WITH A 
BROWN TRIM THEY WILL NOT ONLY PROTECT 
YOUR EQUIPMENT BUT MAKE IT LOOK EVEN 
BETTER WHEN NOT IN USE. 

Atari 800, £2.95. Atari 400 £2.95. 

Disk Drive £2.95. S22 Printer £2.95 

Cassette £1.95 (Please state if old or new model) 

Also available for all other printers — please 
enquire. 

SEND YOUR ORDER TODAY TO 

PAGE 6, 18 UNDERWOOD CLOSE, PARKSIDE 

STAFFORD 

PLEASE MAKE CHEQUES PAYABLE TO 
ABACUS 



i * 



t ' 



i • 



input a 
input e 
input c 

INPUT D 
INPUT E 
INPUT F 
INPUT 6 
ItWT H 



93 POSITION a,28;? 'ANY CHANGES? YES(Y 

) OR N0(N) ' 

95 GET #4,Z 

m If 2=78 THEN GOTO 125 

Ml ? ;? 'PRESS THE KEY(A-H) THAT YOU 

H!SH TO ALTER' 

182 GET M,Z 

183 IF 2=65 THEN ? 'A = 

184 IF 1=66 THEN ? 'B = 

185 IF 1=61 THEN ? 'C ■ 
\U IF l=6S THEN ? "D - 

187 IF 2=63 THEN ? *E = 

188 IF 2=78 THEN ? 'F = 
18? IF 2=71 THEN? ■fi- 
ne IF 2=72 THEN ? 'H = 
115 ? ■>' 

\\i GOTO 31 
125 H=A+B+C+D+E+F+G+H 
\U ? CHR*( 125) 

W ? :? "FINAL BANK STATEMENT BALANCE 
FIGURE IS 1 

128 POSITION 15, Hi? V [i INPUT X 
138 X=X-M 
132 ?CHttU25> 

135 POSITION 2,2:? "ARE THERE ANY CHEQ 
UES NOT INCLUDED OH THE STATEMENT? Y 
R N" 
148 (SET #4,2 

144 IF Z=7S THEN GOTO 148 

145 IF Z=S? THEN ? -.7 :? 'ENTER CHEQUE 
VALUE I'islNPUTH 

147 W(P)=«iX=X-N:P=PH:? 1 }':GOTO 135 

148 ? CH»U25> 



14? POSITION 8,2:? *H- CHEQUES ENTER 

ED -**':? s? :? 

156 IF N(B>B THEN POSITION 17,8s? 'NI . 

L' 

151 IF H<8>-8 THEN GOTO 155 

152 FOR 1=8 TO P-l 

153 ? ' HC*}1|*3 ■ I'jHCI) 

154 NEXT I 

155 POSITION 11,13:? 'ANY MORE? Y OR N 

■ 

156 GET 114 ,2 

157 IF Z=89 THEN ? ')' 

158 IF Z=89 THEN 6OT0 145 

159 ? CHR*< 125) 

166 ? i? * P ;C» 

161 IF X>6 THEN GOTO 165 

162 IF X(8 THEN X=X*-1 

163 ? :? ■ THERE IS - l '?X;' IN THE A 
CCOUNT* 

144 GOTO 178 

165? ;? ' THERE IS I'lXj' IN THE ACC 

OUT' 

178 ? :? 

188 IF C*='FEBRUARY' THEN ? '1? FEB -H 

RH PRINCE ANDREW* 

198 IF C*="MARCH" THEN ? 'YOUR DETAILS 
■ 

288 IF C*= 'APRIL' THEN ? 'YOUR DETAILS 

218 IF Ct=W THEN ? 'YOUR DETAILS" 
228 IF C§='JUNE' THEN ? 'YOUR DETAILS' 
225 IF Ct^'JUhE" THEN ? 'GAS/ELECTRIC/ 
TELEPHONE BILLS DUE'!? 'FATHERS DAY' 



238 IF C*=*JULY" THEN ? '29 JUL - GR#i 

DHA'S BIRTHDAY' 

248 IF CS=" AUGUST' THEN ? "YOUR DETAIL 

S" 

258 IF Ci=*SEPTEMBEr THEN ? 'YOUR DET 

AILS 1 

268 IF Ct=' OCTOBER* THEN ? 'YOUR DETAI 

US" 

278 IF C*= 'NOVEMBER' THEN ? "YOUR (HA 

ILS" 

298 IF C*=' DECEMBER* THEN 7 'YOUR OETA 

ILS" 

298 ? I? 

388 POSITION 2,16:? 'FORD - ZURICH * F 

[AT - PRU' 

318 ? 'BUILDINGS - SUN' 

328 ? 'CONTENTS - CORNHILL ' 

338 ? 'ALL RISKS - GENERAL ACCIDENT ' 

345 POSITION 2,21:? 'ANOTHER HONTH? Y 
ORN' 

346 GET 14, Z 

347 IF Z=89 THEN CLOSE #4:GGT0 62 
358 END 

588 REH CHANGE CHARACTER SET 

516 CKSET=PEEKae6>*T 

528 FOR A=8 TO 1623:P0KE CHSET*256+A,P 

EEK(224)E256+A) :NEXT A 

538 FOR A=8 TO 7 

535 READ B 

548 POKE CHSET)S256t8tA,B 

545 NEXT A 

558 DATA 38,51,121,48,248,112,176,255 

568 RETURN • 



— 



30 PAGE 6 

This page is put aside each issue for the exclusive use of Birmingham User Group 

Bug Club Call 



Issue 4 



Do you realise how many areas of 
responsibility there are in organising a User 
Group? We may not be fully undertaking them 
all but the ideas are all there and can be fulfilled 
if enough members want them to be. Or would 
you rather come along each meeting just for a 
social evening? The committee don't mind if 
that is what you want, it is far easier just to 
book the room and let everybody get on with it. 
The reason for saying all this is that the 
response to the items mentioned in the last 
Club Call was very poor— in fact almost non- 
existent. Thanks to the member who suggested 
an alternative meeting place, which we will 
look into, but apart from that nothing. Nobody 
is interested in Special Interest Groups. Nobody 
is interested in education. Is that really true? 

In the future certain people on the committee 
will assume responsibility for the various areas 
of interest so that you will know who to 
approach when you have any ideas or want to 
participate. Starting at the top, Mike Reynolds- 
Jones will be responsible for arranging 
demonstrations and for liaison with retailers. 
Mike Aston will be responsible for education, 
maintaining notice boards and future projects. 
Keith Mason's responsibilities will include the 
libraries, Special Interest Groups, special 
events and looking after the hardware. Angus 
Irons, who is now Treasurer in place of Steve 
Gould, will assume overall responsibility for 
merchandising, but other individuals will be 
looking after specific items. Mike Reynolds- 
Jones will be looking after sales of cassettes 
produced by the Club. Steve Gould will be 
handling the sale of second-hand software as 
welt as running the software library and selling 
blank cassettes. Colin Boswell has found a 
supply of disks at very reasonable cost whilst 
Julian Bailey will be looking into the possibility 
of producing tee shirts and badges. There is 
even more! Colin Boswell will be in charge of a 
technical library and Les Ellingham will assist in 
getting people together in Special Interest 
Groups. Overall responsibility for ensuring that 
you get a copy of the magazine will belong to 
Mike Aston. That's it. It is up to you to make 
best use of whatever can be arranged. 

For those of you who have missed the last 
meetings, we had a demonstration of an 
American Atari 800 and an American monitor. 
You know the magazines keep talking about 



a rtif acting which when you try it produces nice 
wishy-washy pastel shades on your TV? Not in 
America it doesn't. Those programs are in full 
living colour! You wouldn't recognise some of 
the programs you thought you knew. If you 
have the money, it is worth investigating the 
possibility of importing an American machine 
and monitor. 

Finally, a test to see how many of you are 
interested in special demonstrations. Mike 
Reynolds-Jones would like to get together a 
demonstration of business software for the 
Atari with everything he can lay his hands on 
including AtariWriter, Letter Perfect, Data 
Perfect, File Manager 800, Financial Wizard, 
Chipsoft packages and more. If you have any 
interest in business put your name down. See 
Mike Reynolds-Jones. 

For the next Club Call I want reports from 
each of the people resonsible for the areas 
outlined above and from any individual 
member who wants to say something. The 
copy date will be 1st August. Please write it 
down. Les Ellingham 




SEND TODAY TO: I 

H.REYNOLDS- JONES, 66, CYRIL ROAD, 
SMALL HEATH, BIRMINGHAM BIS 9TG 

1 PLEASE r*WE..CHEQUEygYABL^oajr^ 



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"■'■'■■ " " ■ ■ f '■..-.'- '*■*** fc* * * -* *j* .> y* 1* *? *****"* ■**»*;*.. . 



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Entertainment atarI NEWa 



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Ju^y J 9^3 



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ANTIC 
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COMPUTE 
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Wome Entertainme nt atari cent e r ni-iuBwd^Mn^m^AY 021-643 91 00 

"Home Entertainment Ud is *n indrprndrnt Jejlci m Ai ji. and associated products, Atan, Atari 400 and Alan UO0 arc rrjd*nurk»of Atari Intf rnatnonal (UK) Ltd. 



2S%OFF ATARI SOFTWARE 



Micro-C have selected the most popular Atari 
games and utilities software for a very special offer 
for Page 6 readers. Not only 25% off the retail price, 
but when you buy 2 or more we'll pay the postage 
and packing. 

The catch is that numbers are limited so we 
suggest you act immediately to save yourself any 



disappointment. Better still we can accept telephone 
orders with Barclaycard or Acce ss. These special 
prices are only available via mail 
order and not in any of our shops. 

We only have room to list 
part of our range. If you want 
one you don't see ask us. 




ORDER 
CODE 


TITLE 


CASSETTE,' 
DISK/ 
ROM 


INC. VflT 

WAS 


INC VAT 
NOW 


1 


Adventure Ln.tl Series (Specify) 


c 


£17.99 


£13.49 


2 


Ali Baba 


D 


£24.95 


£19.71 


3 


Alien Hell 


C 


£14.95 


£1121 


4 


Alien Swarm 


CD 


££1.96 


£16.46 


5 


Asteroids 


R 


£29.99 


£22.49 


6 


Asteron IV 


CD 


E21.9S 


£13.41.: 


7 


Astrawarriors 


C 


£19.95 


£ 14.96 


S 


Atlack on EP CYG 4 


CD 


£21-99 


£16.46 


9 


Apple Panic 


D 


£2 1 95 


£16.46 


10 


Bug Attack 


C 


£2;. 96 


£16.46 


11 


Bug OH 


CD 


£21.95 


£16.46 


12 


Candy Factory 


D 


£26,60 


£19.35 


13 


Canyon Climber 


C 


£19.95 


£14.96 


14 


Chicken 


CD 


£26,50 


£19.&B 


15 


Claim Jumper 


CD 


£2B.50 


£19.12 


16 


C1<5whh& Balloons 


C 


£19-95 


£14.96 


17 


CrypN of Terror 


c 


£21.35 


£16,46 


ia 


Cycled 


D 


£19.95 


£14.96 


19 


David's Midnight Magic 


D 


£21.95 


£16.46 


2C 


Dragon's Eyp 


CD 


£21.95 


£16,46 


21 


Embargo 


R 


£29.95 


£2146 


22 


Escape from Volcan's Island 


D 


£21.95 


£16.46 


83 


Fantastic Voyage 


R 


£25.95 


£1946 


24 


Firebird 


R 


£29. 9S 


£22.46 


25 


Ft Apocalypse 


C 


£21.95 


£16.46 


25 


Ft Apocalypse 


D 


£39.95 


£22.46 


38 


Frogger 


D 


E24.&5 


£18.71 


37 


Generic Drift 


CD 


£21.95 


£ia46 


23 


Gorf 


D' 


£24.96 


£18.71 


28 


Gorf 


R 


£29.95 


£2246 


29 


Guardians of Gam 


CD 


£21.9S 


£16.46 


30 


Hazard Run 


CD 


£21.95 


£16.46 


31 


Hockey 


CD 


£21.95 


£16,46 


32 


K-razy Series 


R 


£29.95 


£22,46 


33 


Labyrinth 


C 


£21.95 


£16-46 


34 


Legionnaire 


C 


£27.50 


£20.63 


34 


Legionnaire 


D 


£29.95 


£22.46 


35 


Magatari 


C 


£10-93 


£621 


35 


Magatan 


D 


£13,50 


£10.13 


36 


Marathon 


C 


£19,95 


£14.96 


37 


Matchracer 


C 


£21.95 


£16.46 


38 


Missile Command 


R 


£29.99 


1:23.49 


39 


Monster Maze 


R 


£29.95 


£22.46 


40 


Moonbase I/O 


C 


£2196 


£16.46 


41 


Mousattack 


D 


£24.95 


£18.71 


42 


Nautilus 


C 


£25-50 


£19.13 


42 


Paint 


D 


£27-50 


£20 63 


44 


Plaltermania 


CR 


£29,95 


£22 46 


49 


Mahal] 


CD 


£21.95 


£16.46 


46 


Pathfinder 


D 


£24 95 


£13.7L 


47 


Prep pie 


CD 


£21.95 


£16-45 


48 


Rear Guard 


C 


£16.96 


1 1 3 7 L 


49 


Hebe! Probe 


C 


£21.95 


£16.46 


50 


Hobby the Robot Catcher 


CD 


£21.95 


£16,46 


SI 


Software Automatic Mouth 


D 


£44.95 


£33.71 


53 


Sands of Egyp: 


D 


£29.95 


£22.46 



ORDLB 
CODE 


TITLE 


cassette/ 
disk; 

ROM 


INC. VAT 

WAS 


INC, VAT 

NOW 


53 


Sea/ox 


D 


£211,95 


£16.46 


54 


Sentinel 


CD 


£21.95 


£16.46 


95 


Shamufi 


CD 


£24.95 


£16.71 


55 


Shamus 


R 


£29.95 


£22,46 


5-6 


Shooting Gallery 


C 


£21.95 


£16.46 


97 


Sky Rescue 


CD 


£17.95 


m.46 


36 


Snake Byte 


CD 


£21.95 


£16.46 


S9 


Slime 


C 


£21 95 


£16.46 


69 


Slime 


D 


£29.95 


£22.46 


60 


Snooper Troop 


D 


£29.95 


£22.46 


61 


Sea Dragon 


CD 


£31.93 


£16.46 


62 


Soccer 


CD 


£21.35 


£16.46 


ea 


Space Ace 


C 


£19.95 


£14.96 


64 


Space Shuttle 


D 


£21.95 


£1^46 


65 


Start ase Hyperion 


C 


£17.96 


£13,46 


65 


Starbase Hyperion 


P 


£19.96 


£14.96 


66 


Stare toss 


D 


£25.95 


£21.71 


67 


Strains 


CD 


£24.95 


£16.71 


68 


T T Racer 


C 


119,95 


£14.96 


69 


Ttatk Attack 


D 


£21.95 


£16.46 


70 


Tigers in the Snow 


CD 


£29,95 


£22.46 


71 


Santa Cruz Tricky Tutorials 
No s. VI (Specify) 


c; 


£17.96 


£13.46 


72 


Tumblebuga 


D 


£19.95 


£14.96 


73 


Turmoil 


R 


£25.96 


£19-46 


74 


Tuttt Frutti 


D 


£21.96 


£1646 


75 


Up Up and Away 


C 


£21.96 


SI 6 46 


76 


Upper Reaches of Aeptiai 


C 


>. : ■* 95 


£11.21 


77 


Wizard of Wor 


D 


£24.95 


£16.71 


77 


Wizard of Wo r 


R 


£29.95 


£2246 


76 


Wordmania 


C 


£14.95 


£11.21 


79 


Warlocks Revenge 


D 


£27.95 


£20.96 


SO 


Word: jcu 


D 


£21.95 


£ 1 6.46 


61 


7.crk 


D 


£29.95 


£2?..4<i 



Ft 



To Mjcto-C, 635 London Road High Wycombe, Bucks HP1 1EZ. 
Telephone: (04&4J 40262 (Contact J. Stuart). 
Please send me the following items of software:: 



ORDER 
CODE 


C.DorJt 


QTY 


PRICE 


ORDER 

CODE 


C.CKirR 


QTf 


PRICK 






































































































TOTAL 








TOTAL 





Add £1 for p&p if only 1 item is ordered 
t enclose a cheque for 



TOTAL 



Please charge my Access/Barclaycard no. 
Signed 



Address 



Please allow 28 days for delivery. 



_l